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ISSUED WEEKLY BY 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



VOL. 33 DECEMBER 7, 1936 NO. 23 

FEATURE ARTICLE 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF 
(Page 709) 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Page 

Chinese wheat area restricted by drought 705 

British sugar production decreased 706 

Canadian fruit crop smaller 707 

New Brunswick seed potato stocks short 707 

German-Yugoslav trade agreement supplemented 708 



704 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 23 

LATE CABLES 

France estimates of 1936 crops reported as follows, with 19 35 com- 
parisons in parentheses: Corn 22,046,000 bushels (22,539,000)-, potatoes 
550,709,000 bushels (526,160,000), sugar beets 8,880,000 short tons 
(9,169,000). (International Institute of Agriculture, Rome, December 4, 1936. 

London Colonial wool sales , sixth series for 1936, closed December 2 
with tone of market somewhat quieter than during series as a whole but with 
prices substantially above those prevailing at end of fifth scries on 
September 25. Merinos purchased mainly by Russia, France, Austria, Germany, 
and Switzerland. Crossbreds taken mainly by Yorkshire, French, and German 
buyers. Slipes went mainly to France, the United States, and Yorkshire. 
Compared with closing rates of fifth series, greasy merinos closed 10 to 15 
percent higher and scoured merinos 10 to 12.5 percent higher. Greasy cross- 
breds closed 25 percent higher for fine and 30 percent higher for medium 
and low grades. Scoured fine crossbreds closed 15 to 20 percent, medium 25 
percent, and low 30 percent higher. Advance in lambs wool slipes was 20 to 
25 percent for fine, 25 percent for medium, and 35 percent for low grades. 
In sheeps wool slipes, fine grades closed 20 percent, and medium and low 
25 percent higher. (Agricultural Attache' C. C. Taylor, London, December 2, 
1936. ) 

Brisbane, Australia, wool sales closed December 3 with keen general 
competition. Chief buyers were from Yorkshire and the Continent. Com- 
pared with the opening of this series on November 30, orices were un- 
changed. (Agricultural Attache* C. C. Taylor, London, December 3, 1936.) 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 705 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS 



BREAD GRAINS 

Chinese reheat crop an d market conditions 

Drought conditions continued to he serious in all the wheat- producing 
regions of China daring the 2 weeks ended Ifov ember 27, except in the lower 
Yangtze Valley, according to a radiogram from Agricultural Commissioner Owen 
L. Dawson at Shanghai. In Honan, which is the principal province of the wheat 
area, the acreage sown for the 1937 crop approximates only ah out 60 percent of 
that reported for 1936. Of the total sown, about 25 percent failed to sprout 
or died afterward, and it is now too late to sow again. In other provinces of 
North China, whore sowing and germination have "been about the same as last year, 
the number of plants dying from drought conditions continued to increa.se. In 
those provinces of the Yangtze Valley where seeding may take place as late as 
December, only *&out 20 percent of last year's area had been sown by late No-- 
veaber. 

Prices of wheat and flour at Shanghai advanced slightly daring the last 
week in November as a result of firm world prices, small arrivals of domestic 
wheat, satisfactory flour demand, and the continuation of dry weather over the 
Important wheat areas. The demand for flour was still good in North China, was 
fair in the Yangtze Valley, but declined in South China. Flour stocks on N®w 
vanber 27 were estimated at about 600,000 bags. Mills continued to have diffi- 
culty in securing new wheat from the interior and *s©& reduced operations to 
about 50 percent of their capacity. If world prices should remain at high 
levels and prices of domestic wheat and flour increase during December and 
January to world parity, it was thought that consumption might decline suffi- 
ciently to be covered by the limited domestic supplies available. 3y February 
1, however, it is possible that some foreign wheat may be imported. Total im- 
ports up to July 1, 1937, may exceed the forecast of 3,000,000 bushels made in 
October . 

The spot price of best-quality domestic wheat was quoted at Shanghai 
on November 27 at 99 cents per bushel, while futures ranged from 101 cents per 
bushel for December to 107 ceftts for April* Australian wheat was 119 cents 
end Argentine 115 cents per bushel. Spot domestic flour was 114 cents per bag 
of 49 pounds, the same as the December future price, while the April future 
price was 116 cents per bag. Australian flour, c.i.f. Hong Kong, was $4.42 
per barrel of 195 pounds. No wheat was imported into China during October, 
out flour imports were as follows, with 1935 comparisons in parentheses: From 
Australia 11,000 barrels (25,000), CTanada 11,000 (16,000), United States 4,000 
(5,000) , total 26,000 barrels (48,000). 



706 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 3 3, No. 23 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



SUGAR 

Bri tish sugar p roduction decreased 

Smaller acreage and reduced yields of sugar "beets in Great Britain 
this year will result in the production of much less sugar than was contem- 
plated when the Sugar Act of May 1936 was passed, according to a report 
from Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor at London. The act continued, with 
some modifications, tne Government assistance to producers that was "begun in 
1924 but limited the subsidy to 627,200 short tons of sugor (white equivalent). 
Factor;/' output is not likely to exceed 500,000 tons as compared with 546,000 
last year and 689,000 in 1.234, British production of beat sugar was insig- 
nificant prior to 1924, rose to 30 percent of total requirements 2 years ago, 
and will be about 22 percent this season. Imports of raw sugar have in- 
creased since domestic production declined and will probably be about 230,000 
tons more in 1936 than in 1935. 



UNITED KINGDOM: Sugar subsidy, acreage, production, 

and trade, 1924-1936 



Year of 
harvest 


Sugar 
subsidy 


Acreage 
har- 
' vested 


Production 


Iapo rt 


s a/ 


Export s 

M 


Beets b/ 


' Sugar c/ 


Re- 
fined 


Unre- 
fined 


Re- 
fined d/ 




Pence- 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




per 


1,000 


short 


sho rt 


short 


short 


sho rt 




pound 


acres 


tons 


ton s 


tons 


ton s 


tons 


1924 


2.089 


23 


206 


27 


667 


1 ", 299 


81 


1925 


2.089 


56 


483 


58 


854 


1,515 


74 


1926 


2.089 


129 


1,251 


172 


783 ' 


1,194 


87 


1927 


2.089 


233 


1,683 


212 


525 


1,318 


95 


1928 


1.393 


178 


1,534 


217 


248 


1,914 


84 


1929 


1.393 


231 


2,244 


323 


62 


2,293 


187 


1930 


1.393 


349 


3,428 


470 


65 


2,081 


313 


1931 


.696 


234 


1,867 


282 


61 \ 


1,991 


119 


1932 


.696 


256 


2,500 


370 


31 


2 , 633 


341 


1933 


.696 


365 


3,694 


519 


35 | 


2,249 


380 


1934 


.696 


404 


4,586 


689 


^7 


2,142 ' 


392 


1935 


e/ .696 


375 


3,812 


546 


58 


2,152 


375 


1936 f / 


d -562 


364 


3,400 


500 


30 


2,385 


400 



Compiled from official sources. 

a/ Calendar year; weights irrespective of polarization. p_/ Washed weight, 
c/ White sugar equivalent, &/ Refined sugar includes sugar candy, e/ 50 pence 
per 112 pounds plus allowance for capital invested in factories, approximately 
equal to old rate, but subsidy on molasses (about 9 pence per 112 pouads of 
white sugar) since 1931 was discontinued, f / Preliminary . g/ Plus proceeds 
from sale to refiners of refining quota rights; also subject to adjustment for 
variations in a four-fold set of standard conditions. 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 707 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CO NT' D 



The permanent Sugar Commission appointed last June has "been called upon 
to arbitrate 1937 contract prices for beets. The British Sugar Corporation has 
been ordered to pay somewhat higher prices than for the 1936 crop but the prices 
will be much below those prevailing during the first subsidy periods. Efforts 
are "being made to establish a Sugar Beet Marketing Scheme, similar to the scheme 
nsw operating for hops, potatoes, milk, and bacon hogs. A Sugar Beet Marketing 
Board would be elected "by registered producers to represent growers' interests 
in future negotiations. 



FRUIT, VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 

Canadian fruit crop s maller 

Tree fruits in Canada are a smaller crop this year than last, accord- 
ing to the Department of Trade and Commerce of Canada. The total quantity 
of tree fruit and grapes produced in Canada in 1936 amounted to about 312,000 
short tons against 383,000 tons in 1935. Of the total of 312,000 tons 
produced in 1936, 87.3 percent was apples, 3.6 percent grapes, 3.4 percent 
peaches, 2.8 percent pears, 1.5 percent cherries, 1.2 percent plums and prunes, 
and 0.2 percent apricots. The 1936 apple crop, the most important fruit crop 
grown in Canada, is around 11,333,700 bushels compared with 13,489,200 bushels 
in 1935. The apple crop in all provinces is smaller this year. The production 
in Nova Scotia is placed at 4,500,000 hushels against 5,400,000 "bushels in 
1935. The crop in British Columbia is estimated at 4,448,100 bushels compared 
with 5,144,700 "bushels last season. The estimate for Ontario is 2,052,600 
hushels compared with 2,181,000 in 1935. 

New Brunswick seed potato , stocks shQrt 

It is indicated that there will be a shortage of seed potatoes in 
the spring of 1937 in New Brunswick, Canada, according to a report from Vice 
Consul Frederick C. Johnson at Frederictcn. Prices for seed potatoes this 
year have "been the highest in many years, ranging from $1.75 per barrel of 
145 pounds early in the season to as high as $3,50. Buyers from the State 
of Maine have purchased considerable quantities of New Brunswick seed stock 
of the Green Mountain variety, and prospects for orders from Maine for spring 
delivery are said to be good. It is reported that 50,000 "barrels of seed pota- 
toes were shipped during the current season to South American ports. Approxi- 
mately 235,000 bushels of certified Bliss Triumph seed were exported from 
New Brunswick to Cuba, Florida, Panama, and the British West Indies during 
the season to October 31. It is estimated that only 50,000 "barrels of seed 
stock now remain available in that Province. Farmers are holding their table 
stock potatoes to take advantage of expected higher prices later in the season. 



708 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, Ho. 23 



HEW C-EF&AH-YUGOSLAV AGREEMENT 

The supplementary trade agreement concluded "between Yugoslavia and 
Germany on Ccto"ber 20, 1935, is an excellent example of the methods now being 
used by Germany in the conduct of its foreign trade. According to the Berlin 
office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, the new agreement provides 
Yugoslavia with the possibility of increasing its agricultural exports to Ger- 
many "by as much as 30,000,000 Heichsmarks or $12,000,000 a/, increasing the 
value of agricultural exports to Germany to $30,000,000 compared with about 
$18,000,000 in 1935 and total exports to Germany in that year valued at ap- 
proximately $24,000,000.' 

The new agreement conforms with Germany's policy of seeking increased 
supplies of foodstuffs and feedstuffs under bilateral agreements with neighbor- 
ing countries, particularly those of southeastern Europe. Under these agree- 
ments, however, imports are expected to be balanced in value "by exports of Ger- 
man merchandise. The enlarged market for Yugoslav products in Ger.ia.ny, there- 
fore, is dependent upon the ability of the former country to import increased 
amounts of German goods. In 1935 Yugoslav exports to Germany exceeded imports 
from Germany very materially, "but recent large purchases of German merchandise 
have brought the trade into closer "balance. 

Under the new agreement Yugoslavia ha.s received a substantial increase in 
the dried prune quotas. These formerly stood at 8,000 metric tons for prunes in 
"barrels, sacks, or bulk, 2,000 tons for boxed prunes, and 2,000 tons of low- 
quality prunes for the manufacture of plum butter. These quotas have "been in- 
creased to 8,500, 2,500, and 3,000 metric tons at the same preferential rates 
of about 1.8, 7.2, and 1.8 cents per pound, respectively. Prunes for manu- 
facturing purposes can be imported only by organizations designated by the 
Minister of Agriculture. Erom August through Decemoer 1936 imports of dried 
prunes are permitted at a reduced duty of about 3 cents per pound in unlimited 
quantities provided they are made by an organization designated by the Ministry 
of Agriculture. The Government also has authority to lower or even remove the 
duty on such imports. 



Other specific import quotas granted by Germany to Yugoslavia are: 



Hogs, up to the end of 1936, 


40 , 000 


head 


Hogs, for 1937, 


40,000 


ii 


Cattle, up to the end of 1936, 


10,000 


it 


Cattle, for 1937, 


25,000 


it 


Bacon, annual quota, 


2,200,000 


pounds 


Eat "backs, annual quota, 


2,200,000 


n 


-'-'oo D > 


2 , 200 , 000 


ii 


Poultry, dressed, annual quota, 


6 , 600 , 000 


« Id/ 


Poultry, live, 


5,500,000 


fi c/ 


Corn, annual quota, 


19 ,700,000 


bushels 


TTheat , annual quota, 


18,400,000 




Corn or wheat, (additional) annual quota, 


55,115 


short tons 


Beans, dried 


4,400,000 


pounds 


Push canes, 


8,800,000 


ii 



a/ Converted at average rate of exchange for October 1936. 

b/ Plus 1,200,000 pounds dressed geese, c/ Plus 1,000,000 pounds live geese. 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



709 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF a/ 

An upward trend in prices is an outstanding feature of the current 
world, situation in cattle and "beef, according to information available in 
the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Reductions in numbers "below the 1934 
and 1935 levels are evident in many of the commercially important cattle- 
producing countries . 

Reduced numbers in North America are largely the result of drought 
in 1934 and 1936- ' Numbers also declined in Europe, where there is a ten- 
dency to bring livestock production into closer al ighment ' vri th domestic 
feed supplies. In South America, some liquidation has resulted from the 
effort to make supplies conform with the contracting European market outlet. 
In the British Empire exporting countries, production is being encouraged, 
particularly in Australia, through preferential treatment in the British 
market, but numbers so far reported for 1936 are no larger than in 1935. ' 

Beef is imported into the United States chiefly in the form of live 
cattle from Canada and Mexico, and as canned beef from South America. Current 
information suggests that the number of foreign cattle available for ex- 
port to the United States is no larger than it was a year ago, and that, 
as usual, American prides will largely govern the volume of- imports. 
In canned beef, the South American exporting countries may be expected to 
continue their efforts to expand their sales in the United States and other 
Markets. The British policy of favoring domestic and Empire fresh, frozen, 
and chilled beef in the British market is responsible for most of the South 
American shift to canning beef for export. The larger German imports of 
South American beef this year are in sharp contrast to the policy of con- 
tinued import limitation followed by other European countries. 

. Foreign cattle an d, beef supplies as related to th e United States 

With respect to imports of live cattle into the United States from 
Canada and Mexico, American price levels are the primary factor. The 
higher prices, fallowing the 1934 drought, resulted in total dutiable im- 
ports of cattle from the two nearby countries reaching 363,810 head in 1935 
against only 57^678 head in 1934. During 1936, reduced rates of duty were 
in effect for a limited number of certain types of cattle. It how appears, 
However, that total cattle imports this year will be no more than 50,000 
head larger than in 1935. During 1936, prices of cattle of the type repre- 
senting the bulk of the imports averaged very little under the 1935 level. 

The "Agricultural Outlook for 1936", issued by the Bureau of Agri- 
cultural. Economics early in November, stated that n In view of the smaller 

-j — ■ — ■ L _ , . . 

ay Comparable statistics for earlier years than those covered in this 
article may be found in "Foreign Crops and Markets" for June 10 and 17, 
1935. 



710 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 23 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



supplies of grain-fed Oat tie in late 1936 and early 1937 and the further 
improvement in consumer demand in prospect, prices of such cattle are 
expected to rise to higher levels. The advance, however, probably will not 
be so great as that which occurred in late 1934 and early 1935, following 
the drought of 1934. Prices of the lower grades of slaughter cattle during 
the first half of 1937 probably will advance at least as much as usual for 
that period. A rather broad demand for replacement stock of all kinds is in 
prospect next spring if crop and pasture conditions are fairly normal, and 
this will result in relatively high prices for cows and heifers at that time. 
Conditions in general indicate that prices for cattle of all kinds in 1937 
will average higher than in 1936 and will be fairly well maintained for 2 or 
3 years, or until hog production is increased to near the levels of 1929-1933'! 

The foregoing statement suggests that the United States cattle market 
in 1937 will be somewhat more attractive to Canadian and Mexican cattle than 
in 1936. There is considerable doubt, however, with respect to there being 
any appreciably larger numbers available for export from those two countries 
in 1937 than in 1936. In Canada particularly, there is reason to believe 
that cattle numbers next year will be somewhat smaller than they were this 
year. A price increase in Canada somewhat comparable with that of the United 
States, which seems likely, would tend to discourage exports to this country. 

Consideration of the United 'States import trade in cattle and beef 
indicates that, despite the increases registered in 1935 and 1936, such im- 
ports continue to represent a relatively small share of total supplies. In 
1936 they amounted to less than 4 percent of the estimated total live weight 
of all cattle and calves slaughtered in the United States. The United 
States is more than self-sufficient with respect to total supplies of all 
types of meat. Variations in domestic supplies and in the strength of con- 
sumer purchasing power are of such importance with respect to prices as 
virtually to preclude any influence on general price levels arising from 
imported supplies. It follows, therefore, that domestic conditions result in 
prices which govern the volume of imports, rather than imports being a factor 
in setting our price level. 

World cattle numbers 

There was apparently an increase in world cattle numbers between the 
census year 1930 and 1934. The number of cattle in 68 countries supporting 
three- fourths of the world total was estimated at 524,000,000 in 1934, an 
increase of 4 percent above the census year 1930. Most of the important 
cat tie-pro due i'Eig countries of the Southern Hemisphere are included in these 
totals. The upward trend in cattle numbers in the United States and in 
Europe, which continued for 5 or 6 years, reached a peak in 1954. In the 
past 2 years, numbers have remained fairly stationary at a materially lower 
level. 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



711 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 

In the United States , cattle numbers at the beginning of 1936 
were 8 percent smaller than in the record year 1934. Canada also re- 
ported smaller numbers in 1935 and 1936. The latest estimate for Mexico 
is the census of 1930, which placed numbers there are 10,083,000. In 
Europe, 1936 estimates for 11 important countries show a reduction of 
2 percent since 1934. Decreases are noted in the United Kingdom , France , 
Germany^ and C z e cho s lo vaki a, whereas increases are shown in Denmark , Belgium , 
Lithuania , and some of the countries of southeastern Europe. 

It seems probable that numbers in Argentina and Uruguay ,, which 
countries depend principally on the British, market for disposal of a 
large export surplus of beef, reached a peak in 1931 or 1932, the year 
of the Ottawa Agreements, which restricted imports into the United 
Kingdom from foreign countries. Numbers in Argentina were estimated 
at 30,868,000 in July 1934 and were 4 percent smaller than at the time 
of the 1930 census. The number in Uruguay in 1932 was 7,372,000, 
which was 3 percent larger than in 1930. Since 1932 there has been some 
liquidation of breeding stock and of calves in both these countries. 

Numbers in Australia and New Zealand, important British Dominions 
in the Southern Hemisphere, continued to increase each year from 1931 
or 1932 to 1934 or 1935, partly as a result of their favored position 
in relation to the British market . Such estimates as are available for 
1936, however, show a slight decrease in cattle numbers in New Zealand 
and also probably a very slight decrease in Australia. Returns are 
not available as yet for all States in Australia, but there was a de- 
crease in Queensland, the principal cattle State, of 1 percent during 
1935. In the Union of South Africa the latest census, that of August 
31, 1935, shows an increase of approximately 4 percent above 1934, 
but the number was still 2 percent below the 1930 census figures. 
Losses estimated at 753,000 head in 1932-33, owing to prolonged drought, 
are principally responsible for the reduction in the Union as compared 
with 1930. Cattle numbers there had increased each year for the 12 
years prior to 1930. (For details see table, page 713.) 

Beef production and consumption 

Figures so far available for 1936 indicate that in most of the 
Southern Hemisphere exporting countries the 1935 upturn in cattle 
slaughter continued into the current year. In the United States and 
Canada, inspected cattle slaughter and beef production have been larger 
this year than last. The larger North American supplies of beef have 
been meeting an improved consumer demand. Of the British Empire ex- 
porting countries, Australia appears to be making the outstanding current 
increase in beef production, in South America liquidation is indicatpd. 

Slaughter of cattle and calves in eight important beef-exporting 
countries amounted to approximately 19,000,000 head in 1935, an increase of 
5 percent above 1934 and 15 percent above 1932. 



712 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 23 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF , CONT'D 

The leading importing country, the United Kingdom, showed an increase 
of 17 percent "between 1932.-33 a ^d 193^-35 but a decrease of 8 percnet in 
1935-36. In Germany, cattle and calf slaughter, after having increased 
for several years, decreased 1 percent in 1535 with a sharper decrease in 
prospect for 153 ^ - In France, on the other hand, slaughter in 193^ and 
1935 w &s considerably- larger than for several years. The increase was 
continued into the current year. 

It is estimated that commercial slaughter of cattle and calves in 
11 important beef- and veal- producing countries, including the 8 exporting 
countries mentioned above, amounted to approximately 52,000,000 head in * 
1935) a decrease of about 1 percent below 193^- but an increase of 15 per- 
cent above 1932. These estimates include the United States, where the 
1535 inspected slaughter was h percent smaller than in 193 4 « Beef and 
veal production in the same 11 countries is estimated at 19,000,000,000 
pounds, which was also about 1 percnet smaller than in 193^« This 1-per- 
cent decrease in meat production compared with the same percentage de- 
crease in slaughter indicates marketings at about the same weights as in 
193^-. Some countries show a material reduction in average weights in 
1935 below 193^-* This applies to the United States and Germany, espe^ 
cially, and to export slaughter in Argentina. The 11 countries for which 
estimates are available produce roughly two-thirds of the world commercial 
supply of beef and veal. 

Considering reported export slaughter alone, there was an increase 
in British Empire countries of over 100 percent from 1932 to 1935, where- 
as in Argentina and Uruguay the increase has been 2U percent. The increase 
in export slaughter in 1935 over 193 ^ was 33 percent in the Empire countries 
and 12 percent in the two South American countries. Slaughter for export 
in the Empire countries constituted about one-half of the slaughter for 
that purpose in Argentina and Uruguay. The two European exporting countries 
for which data are available showed an increase of 5 percent in slaughter 
in 1935 over 193^* Since 1932, however, there has been a decline of k percent 
in slaughter in these countries. 

In slaughter for domestic consumption, Argentina and Uruguay showed 
an increase in 1935 of 6 percent above 193^ and an increase of 22 percent 
compared with 1932, the year of the Ottawa Agreements. On the other hand, 
although slaughter for domestic consumption in the British Empire countries 
is now somewhat larger than in 1932, there was a decrease of 5 percent in 
1935 as compared with 193^. 

Per-capita consumption of beef declined in 1935 i n practically all 
countries except those of South America, where it continued to increase. 
There was a decrease in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, 
Germany, and France. In most of these countries per-capita consumption of 
beef increased for 3 or k years to reach a peak in 193^. The increase in 
per-capita consumption of beef and veal coincided with a decrease in the 
consumption of pork in most importing countries. (See tables, Pages 719 
and 721.) 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 713 

THE WOELD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND EEEF , CONT'D 



CATTLE: Number in countries having 150,000 head or over, 
average 1926-1930, annual 1931-1935 



Country 


Month 
of 

e st imate 


Average 
' 1926-1930 

JEi/ 


; 1931 


; 1932 


j 1933 


i 1934 : 


1935 


NORTH AND CENTRAL 
AMERICA AND WEST 




r * Thou- 
sands 


: Thou-, 
sands 


: Thou- 
sands 


\ Thou- 
: sands 


; Thou- ; 
• 'sands ■ 


Thou- 
sands 


INDIES 
United States 


Jan . 1 


59,191 
8 ,360 
c/ 7,834 
397 
\ 51 7 ) 

CL/ V OoO j 

f / 900 
436 
4,496 
694 
d/ 311 


63,030 
7,991 
d/10,083 
387 
ey 51 7 

A'XQ 
'tOO 

e/ 800 
e/ 399 
4,991 
e/ 900 
d/ 311 


' 65,770 
8,511 


i 70,214 
■ 8,876 


j 74,263 


68,529 


Canada 


•June 


j ' 8,953 


8,821 


Mexico 


June 
July 




369 


451 












Salvador 








j 477 
















: — 


■ 1 




fca 

Dominican Republic 


gj Jan. 

May 


4,349 



j 4,462 
; 


: 4,123; 


4,515 


All No. and Cen. 
Amer. countries 
reporting all pe- 
riods to 1934(4) h/ 
To 1935(3) h/ 
Estimated total %J 
SOUTH AMERICA 
Colombia 












- 


72,875 
72 , 547 


76^.450 
76,012 


79 ,084 
78 , 630 


84,075 
' 83,552 


87,814 
87,337" 


81,865 




84 , 500 












6,857 
f/ 3,000 
148 
1,282 
d / 1 806 
1,918 
*3 , 1 133 
(47,492) 
d/ 7,128 
(4,500) 
k/32 212 


8,000 
e/ 3,000 
181 

1,290 
rl / 1 806 

2,064 
d/ 2,388 
47,492 
d/ 7,128 
f / 4,000 


7,592 




7,973* 




'Venezuela 








British Guiana 




186 


160 


150 




Ecuado r 










Feb 






fj 1,850 




Bolivia 








Chile 











2,463 


-ordzii j_/ 

1 1 "IT*" 1 PflT *~i t-w> 


Sept. 


7 ,372 
f/ 4,000 






Paraguay 


g/jan.l 









Argentina 


Jan . 1 




30,868] 




All So. Amer. coun- 
tries reporting 
8 -H periods 

To 1934 (1) h/ 












148 


181 


186 


160 


150 


Estimated total i/ 




108 , 500 










EUROPE 


June 
June 
June^. 
June 


6,072 ' 
1,218 

695 
4,059 


6,065 
1,209 
681 ! 
4 , 029 


6,358 
1 , 233 
715- 
4,025. 


6 , 620 
1 , 279 j 


6,660 
1,313 


6,539 
1,315 

799 
4,020 


Scotland. . 


Northern Ireland 

Irish Free State. . . . 


734. 
4,137'' 


4,086 



714 



cat: 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 23 

THE 1i70 RLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 

I: Ifuigiber in countries having 150,000 ho- ad or over, 
average 1926-1930, annual 1931-1935, cont'd 



Country 



Month 

of 

estimate 



Average 
1926-1930 

a/ 



1931 



1S32 



1933 



1934 



1935 



EUROPE, CONT'D 



1/ 



Norway 

Sweden 

Denmark. . . . 

Holland. . . . 

Belgium. . . . 

France 

Spai n 

Portugal . . . 

Italy i/, . . 

Switzerland 

Germany . . . . 

Austria. . . . 

Czecho Slovakia 

Hungary 

Yugoslavia j_/ 

Greece j_/ 

Bulgaria 

Romania 

Poland. . . 

Lithuania 

Latvia. . . 

Estonia. . 

Finland. . 

Russia, European 
and Asiatic 

All European coun- 
tries excl. 
Rassia reporting 
all periods 

To 1934 (20) hj 
To 1935 (18) h/ 

Estimated total 
ex. Russia l/. . .<. 
AFRICA 

Ethiopia 

Morocco 

Algeria 

Tuni s 

French W. Africa 

French Sudan .... 

Nigeria (& British 
Cameroons) 



Thou- 
sands 



June 
.June-July: 
July ; 
May-June 
g/ Jan. 
g_/ Jan. 

SlI Jan- 
March 
Mar. -Apr . 
Apr. 

g/ Jan. 

May- June 

g/ Jan. 
Apr. 

g/ Jan. 

g/ Jan. 

g/ Jan. 

g/ Jan . 
June 

g/ Jan. 
June 
July 
Sept. 



1 

2 
2 

d/ 2 
1 
14 

3 

*J 

d/ 7 
1 
17 

d/ 2 

/ 

1 

3 

2 

9 
1 



221 
980 
981 
366 
719 
886 
714 
853 
108 
598 
776 
313 
693 
814 
749 
926 
266 
820 
019 
245 
977 
623 
,841 



64,900 



81,594 

79 , 130 



103 , 700 



Mar. 31 

g/ Jan.. 



(4,000) 
1,971 
903 
464 
2,536 
1,025 

3,117 



Thou- 
sands, 

1 , 310 

3,109 
3,208 
d/2,366 
* 1,759 
15,467 
(3,655) 

d/7 , 108 
" 1,609 
IS ,470 

4,459 
1,314 
3,850 
881 

o/4 , 159 
9 ,78 6 
1,034 
1,117 
669 
1,822 

47,900 



Thou- 
sands 

1,342 
3,120 
3,237 

(2,700) 
1 , 758 

15,434 
3,654 



19,124 

4,451 
1,819 
3,912 
913 

4,269 
9,461 
1,121 
1,153 
692 
1,806 

40 , 700 



Thou- 
sands 

1,340 
3,086 
3,134 
2,877 
1,784 
15 , 643 
ml 4,164 



1, 684 
19 , 139 

4,341 
1,697 
3,851 
921 

4,382 
8,985 
1,154 
1,156 
682 
1,745 

38 , ^400 



Thou- 
sands. 

1,294 

3,061 
2,830 
1,813 
15,830 
(4,190) 



1 , 659 
19 , 739 
n 1 2 , 349 
4,405 
1 , 678 
3,913 
964 



9,258 
1,156 
1,158 
676 
1 , 767 

42 , 400 



Thou- 
sands . 

1,328 
2,919 
3,073 
2 , 640 
1 , 640 

15,704 
4,215 

ll 905 

1,590 
19,198 

4 , 303 
1,756 
4,029 
1,003 

4 , 519 
9 ,759 
1,158 
1,272 



, 300 



13,651 
81,160 



84,918 
82,42 0 



85,383 
82,956 



86,560 
84,117 



83,951 



1 90 Q 
872 
502 
2,779 
1,400 

3,056 



1 , 954 
893 
540 
2,796 
1 , 149 

2 , 762 



2,049 
896 
543 
2,727 
1,287 

2,916 



,964 
884 
544 

, 536 



2,795 



850 
487 



) December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops ana Markets 715 

THE WOELD SITUATION IN CATTLE AMD BEEF , CONT'D 

CATTLE: Number in countries having 150,000 head or over, 

average 1926-1930, annual 1931-1935, cont'd 



Country 



AFRICA, CONT'D 
Trench Cameroon..., 



Sgypt j./ 

4ngl5-Egyptiah Sudan 

Itelirn Somaliland. 

Sri t re a. 

Kenya Colony 

Uganda 

Fr. Equatorial Africa 

Belgian Congo 

Buandi - Urundi .... 

Angola - Portugese, 
lest Africa 

British S.tf. Africa 

Bechuanaland ....... 

Union of So. Africa 

Basutoland 

Rhodesia; Northern. 

Southern. 

Swaziland 

Tanganyika Territory 

Nyasal&nd 

Mozambique (Portu- 
guese East Africa) 

Madagascar 

All African coun- 
tries reported 
all periods 

To 1934 (24) h/ 
To 1935 ( 8) h/ 
Estimated total i_/ 
ASIA 

Turkey ,Eur.& Asiatic 

Iran 

Syria and Lebanon. 
India j_/ British. . 

Native States' 

Ceylon $J 

China, including 
Turkestan, Manchuria 
& Inner Mongolia. . . . 
Japan „ 



56,900 



Dec .-Apr 
g/ Jan.l 

g/ Jan.l' 



5,464 
( 1 , 000 
300 
151,847 
38 , 532 
1,570 



p_/ 23,000 
1 , 474 



5,363 
1,622 
426 
152,868 
49 ,430 
1,660 



1,498 



5,900 
1,816 
486 
152,762 
49 , 579 
1,580 



1,512 



5,666 
2,174 
475 
152,791 
49 , 564 
1 , 580 



p/23,000 
1 , 529 ' 



5,710 

392 
152,925 

1,614 



1,560 : 



; Month 


Ave rage 












\ of 


1926-1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 . 


'.estimate 


a/ 














Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 




sands 


sands 


sands 


sands 


; . sands 


: sands 




412 


504 


504 


500 


343 




\ Sept. 


1,551 


1, 614 


1,791 


1,769 


\ 1,812 


: --- 




1,461 


1,200 


1,250 


1 , 300 


: 2 , 500 




j Feb. 


1 , 110 


1,000 


900 





; 


! 




d/ 749 


800 


900 


1,000 


: l.ooo 


! — — 


:Mar r-June 


3,812 


f ./ 5,203 


f/ 5,214 


f / 5,225 


if/ 4,966 


I 


:g/ Jan. 


1,605 


1,985 


2,065 


2 , 152 


1 2,107 


2 , 223 




1,278 


1, 530 


1,560 


1,340 


j 897 


■ 




303 


312 


318 


298 


; 302 






887 


831 


763 


823 


1 , 300 


■ . 




1 , 073 


e/ 1,430 


1 ,570 










643 


645 


725 


628 


: 622 




" Jan . 1 


602 


641 


642 


; S00 


! 930 


1,300 


; Aug. 


10,640 


a/10,751 






: 10,164 


\ 10,57? 




653' 


600 


550 


550 


: 400 




:g/ Jan.l 


415 


466 


452 


485 


■ 484 


: 523 


' & 1 Jan . 1 


2,268 


2,468 


2 ,582 


2 ,747 


: 2,689 


2,634 


■ s: 1 Jan . 1 


316 


334 


372 


319 


| 310 


326 


■g/ Jan.l 


4,823 


5,099 


5,336 


5,450 


4,853 




i Mar. 31 


151 


175 


183 


198 


: 200 






446 


517 


519 


521 


532 




'• Jan.l 


7,191 


6,705 


6,760 


6,575 


6,169 


5,693 




38,557 


40,746 


41,431 


41,911 


41 , 139 






13 ..7/M 


13,973 


14,306 


14,617 


14,117 


14,036 



Continued - 



716 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Wo. 23 

THE tfORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND 3EEF, CONT'D 



CATTLE: Number in countries having 150,000 head o 
average 1926-1930, annual 1931-1935, con 



r over, 
t'd 



Country 



Month 



Average 





i — — - j 
; i q pc i o "in 

1 IJCC- Xy OU 


, it/ OX 


1 Q7P 


liOu 


xyoft 


: iQ'TR 

Xf OU 


s t ima t 


£> a/ 










: h/ 




; Thou- 


. , Thou- 


; Thou- 


; Thou- 


: Thou- 


• Thou- 




sands 


sands 


: sands 


; sands 


! sands 


: sands 


Jan.l 


j 1,586 


• 1,612 


1,637 


I 1 , 664 


\ 1,663 


; 1 , 671 


Tan 1 


■ ODD 


C' X 


oo o 


! 3A7 


' 3R A 
, Oo O 






3 R9 6 


3 913 


3 9T 7 


! 3 R^A 


! 3 7R6 




Mar. 


j 6,783 


9,513 


9,867 


: 10,126 


; 10,299 




0 cLi t X 


P QHQ 


O , lirr^ 


3 A*XP 


3 R1 A 


3 ROR 


' 7 p,ip 


Tor, 1 

o sm. x 


i R 7P,R 


R 7CQ 


c r\~\ A. 


. O , OoX 


A PPA 


c oaa 


Tan 1 
U oil • J- 




Cj , UCt 




' ? OAR 


p n^? 


■ 1 97R 




1 QC QIC 


loo TOE 
Xoo , COD 




i on q 
xoy , y Oft 


xy u , xoy 








Xc7 | f ID 


PD ft^P 


PO AT 0 


PO RAT 


P0 R^ 




250 , 300 












Jan. 1 


11,873 


11,721 


12,260 


12,783 


13,512 


14,049 


J an . 


o , -toy 


*± , UbX 




A T QP 


A 


A ?Q3 




15,312 


15,802 


16,332 


16,975 


17,813 


18 ,342 




15.312 


15,802 


16,332 


16,975 


17,813 


18,342 




15 , 500 














459 , 302 


453,055 


452 , 210 1 


456,358 i 


466,065 






264,884 


254,563 


253,020" 


257,310 ; 


266,625; 


268,351 




684,300 ; 













ASI A - CONT'D 

Chosen 

Formosa j_/ 

French Indo- China fj 
Siam j_/ 



Dutch East Indies: 
Java & Madura ji/ 
Outer Posessions j./ 
ill Asiatic coimtrieg 
ex. Russia reported 
all periods 

To 1934 (12) h/ 
To 1935 ( 6) h/ 
Estimated total 

ct. Russia i/ 

OCEAN IA 

Australia 

New Zealand 

A.11 Oceania coun- 
. tries reported all 
periods 

To 1934 (2) h/. . . 
To 1935 (2) h/. . . 
Estimated total if. . 
Total countries re- 
porting all periods 
including Poissia 
To 1934 ( 64) h/. . 
To 1935 (38) h/. • 
Estimated world total 
including Russia i_/ 



Compiled from reports from Un 
abroad, official sources, and 
otherwise stated. Figures in 
iod, if available, otherwise 
otherwise stated, h/ Estimat 
head: United States, 68,213; 
State, 4,003; Denmark, 3,116; 
Germany, 18,854; Lithuania, 1 
Philippine Islands, 3,688; Cz 



ited States Department of Agri culture representatives- 
the Intemation Institute of Agriculture unless 
parentheses interpolated, a/ Average for 5-year per- 

for any year or years within this period except as 

es available for 1936 are as follows in thousands of 
England and Wales, 6,534; Scotland, 1,313; Irish Free 
Belgium, 1,837; France, 15,670; Switzerland, 1,567; 

,163; Algeria, 840; Uganda, 2,187; Turkey, 6', 709; 

ech* Slovakia, 4,233; Greece, 1,016; New Zealand, 4,254. 



Notes continued - 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



717 



CATTLE: Number in countries having 150,000 head or over, 
average 1926-1930, annual, 1931-1935, cont'd 

cj Average of 1926 estimate for 96 percent of the municipalities and the final 
figures of the April 26, 1930, census. This census is the first complete census 
for Mexico and, therefore, is not strictly comparable with earlier estimates, 
d/ Census, 1930. e/ Year 1930 or nearest year, f/ Unofficial, g/ Countries re- 
porting as of December have been considered as of January 1 of following year, 
h/ Comparable totals for number of countries indicated in parentheses, i/ This 
total includes interpolations for a few countries not reporting each year, and 
rough estimates for some others, j/ Buffaloes included, k/ Census, June 1930. 
l/ In rural communities only, m/ The census in the spring of 1933 was 3,569,000 
compared with 3,660,000 in May 1929. n/ Census, o/ Estimate of total number 
based on number in rural communities only as compared with last year, p/ Esti- 
mate for China based on official figures in 1932 or 1933 for 22 Provinces, which 
supported 98 percent of total in 1914. Official estimate excluding Turkestan 
and Inner Mongolia was 22,333,000 in 1932 or 1933. 



CATTLE AND CALVES : 



Estimated slaughter in exporting 
average 1926-1930, annual 1931- 



and importing countries, 
1935 



Country 



Average 
1926-1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



1935 
Prel. 



; EXPORTING COUNTRIES 
South America 
Argentina: 

Freezing plants 

Salting plants 

Canned meat plants . . 
Liniers market, 33. A. 
Total (excl. farm) a/ 
Uruguay : 

Freezing plants 

Salting plants ...... 

Canned meat plants . . 
Domestic consumption 
Total (excl. farm) . . 

Brazil , total e/ 

British Dominions 
Australia: 

For export only ...... 

Total - 

New Zealand f / 

Canada : 

Inspected 

Total 

Union of South Africa: 
At principal abattoirs 
T o t al , in eluding 
European farms g/ 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
sands 



2,920 


2,296 


2,221 


2,342 


2,606 


2,648 


392 

907 
6,389 


210 
809 
5,383 


: 159 
i 873 
5,344 


'. 185 
1 928 
5,703 


1 

123 
942 
6,002 


203 
1,072 
6,399 


751 
37 
28 

476 
1,293 


617 

8 
3 

448 
1,076 
2,953 


497 

& 
2 

435 
937 
2, 626 


532 
6 
2 

472 
1,012 
3,269 


600 
13 
3 

490 
1,106 
3,404 


b/ 692 
c/ 61 
c/ 12 
b/ 544 
d/l , 309 


407 
2,057 
733 


425 
1,728 
938 


397 
2,031 
1,019 


527 
2,206 
1,443 


646 
d/2 , 330 
~ 1,265 


853 
d/2, 423 
~ 1,265 


1,094 
2,140 


963 
1, 698 


937 
1,669 


1,092 
1,715 


1,347 
2,137 


1,377 
2,036 


415 


353 


328 


412 


449 


471 


676 


522' 


594 


701 ; 


701 


799 



Continued - 



718 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Yol. 33, Ho. 23 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



CATTLE AND CALVES: Estimated slaughter in exporting and importing countries, 
a verage 1 926- 1930, ann ual 1931-1935, con t'd 



Country 


1926-1930 


1931 


1932 


IS 33 


1934 


1935 
Prel. 




j Thou— 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


EXPORTING COUNTRIES, CONT 


D ; sands 


sands 


sands 


sands 


sands 


sands 


Europe 














Netherlands: 


j 












Total, inspected . *». 




897 


1,056 


1,214 


1,243 


1,313 


Poland: 


















3, 655 


3,602 


3,405 


3,042 


3,204 






3, 796 


3,783 


3, 551 


3,184 


3,343 


IMPORTING COUNTRIES 












United States: 










hyi 6,020 






..; 13,691 


12,825 


12,117 


13,562 


15,345 






20 , 948 


20,545 










..; 3,486 


3,234 


3,452 


3,830 


4 t 046_ 


3,742 


Germany: 
















..j 7,828 


7,468 


7,957 


7,851 


9,035 


8,917 






7,512 


8,000 


7,894 


9,079 


8 , 955 






6,418 


6,208 


6,222 


6,533 


6,528 






681 


800 










. . i 395 


370 


411 


431 


491 








1 , 744 


1,810 


1,638 


1,821 





Countries arranged in order of importance as net exporting and importing coun- 
tries of "beef and "beef products except that the United States has been placed 
first under importing countries for convenience. 

a/ Farm slaughter has been roughly estimated at 1,000,000 head annually by the 
Buenos Aires office of the Bureau Of Agricultural Economics, jb/ Estimates for 
year based on statistics published in the Review of the River Plate, cj Estimates 
for year "based on 6 months' statistics* dj Estimates for year based on incomplete 
statistics, ej Estimate obtained by dividing "beef and veal production as offi- 
cially estimated by an ascertained average dressed weight, fj Season beginning 
April 1. g/ Year beginning July 1. Estimates for years 1931 and 1932 are those 
of the Imperial Economic Committee published in the Cattle and Beef Survey, June 
1934. Figure* for subsequent years are unofficial estimates based on slaughter 
at principal markets, hj Including cattle and calves purchased and slaughtered 
for relief purposes, the number was 20,729,000. i_/ Tear beginning June 1. 
Estimates "based on official method of estimating production in England and Wales 
as explained in the Agricultural Output for 1930, in which birth and death rates 
and average weights were revised, j / For method of estimating, see United 
States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin 37, Agricultural Survey of 
Europe, France, by Dr. Louis G. Michael. 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D ; 



719 



BEEF AND VEAL: Estimated production in exporting and importing countries, 

average 1926-1930, annual 1931-1935 ..., 



Country 



Average' 
1926- 
1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



19.34 



1935 
Prel. 



EXPORTING COUNTRIES a/ 
South America 
Argentina: 
Freezing plants . . 
Salting plants . . . 
Oanned meat plants 
Linisrs market h/ 
Total (excluding 

farm) p_/ 

Total (including 

farm) b/ 

Uruguay: d_/ 
Freezing plants . . 
Salting plants . . . 
Canned meat plants . . . 
Domestic consumption . 
Total (excluding farm) 
Brazil 

Total 

British. Dominions 

Australia 

New Zealand c/ 

Canada: 

Inspected h/ 

Total 

Union of South Africa 
At principal abattoirs 
Total, including 
European farms d/ . . . 
Europe 
Poland: 

Inspected e/ 

Total e/ 

IMPORTING COUNTRIES 
United States: 

Inspected 

Total 

United Kingdom and 
Irish Free State p_/ . . . . 



Million 
pounds 



Million 
pounds 



Million 
pounds 



Million 
pounds 



Million 
pounds 



Million 
pounds 



X , DO<o 


1 HQ A 


X , i-UU 


1 A- 'J A. 


\ V, OD I 


J- , do* 


142 


52 


' 57 


.73 


: • -47 


; ■ 76 


Ode, 


ACQ 
(O 




ODo 


' ODo 


■ DUO 


3,675 


3,181 


3,324 


3,399 


j 3,54-7 


j 3,609 


4,251 


3,772 


3,946 


3,995 


4,138 


j 4,178 


305 




214 


230 


dbd 


30 <o 


15 


3 


1 


2 


6 


: 27 


11 


1 


1 


1 


; 1 


! t> 


193 


190 


187 


204 


214 


238 


524 


455 


403 


437 


/Art 

483 


f— r> 

572 


808 


1,382 


1, 229 


1 , 530 


1 r n -7 

1, 593 




1,011 


774 


881 


957 






oUD 


TOO 

odd 


61 I 


a r\o 
4tUo 






390 


342 


333 


388 


478 


489 


691 


604 


593 


609 


759 


723 


268 


199 


189 


240 


262 


276 


445 


334 


387 


457 ' 


457 j 


521 


472 


524 


586 


541 


458 : 


483 


484 


537 


587 j 


555 j 


472 


497 


5,039 


4,751 


4,394 ; 


5,046 i 


5,602 • 


5,167 


7,359 


6,992 


6,745 








1, 605 


1,515 - 


1,676 j 


1,819 j 


1,825 j 


1,795 



Continued - 



720 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol* 33, No. 23 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEE, CONT'D 



BEEF AND VEAL: Estimated production in exporting and importing countries, 
average 1926-1930, annual 1931-1935, cont'd 



Country 



Average 
1926- 
193,0 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



1935 

..Prsi, 



IMP ORT DIG- COUNTFJE S , CO NT ' Dj 
Germany: 

Inspected 

Total 

France 

Belgium 

Norway: 

Inspected 

Total 

Czechoslovakia 



Million; 
•pounds 



2,270 
2,283 
1,835 

268; 

61: 
85| 
477 



Million; 
p ounds 



2,323 
2, 333 
2,129 

240 

62 
91, 
493 



Million 
pounds 



2,386 
2,395 
2,029; 

283! 

69 



Million 1 
pounds 



2,341; 
2,350 
1,990 



Million Million 
pounds : pounds 



481 



93 
366 



2,642^/ 
2>65l;f/ 
2,058 



64 
93j 
477; 



2,612 
2,619 
2,077 



Compiled from official sources unless otherwise stated. Edible offal not in- 
cluded for the United States. Assumed that it is not included for other coun- 
tries unless specifically stated. Later figures, if any, appear in the text. 
Countries arranged in order of importance as net exporting and importing coun- 
tries of beef and beef products with the exception of the United States, which 
has been placed first as an importing country for convenience, 
a/ Countries in which exports usually exceed imports. 

b/ Estimated by multiplying slaughter by an ascertained average dressed weight, 
c/ Season beginning April 1, farm production included. Production 1931 to date 
revised on basis of 600 pounds dressed weight of cattle instead of 700 pounds as 
officially reported formerly, 
d/ Season beginning July 1. 

ej Estimates for 1932 and subsequent period based on study made recently and 
published by the Polish Central Statistical Office entitled "Regions d'Elevage, 
Production et Con semination de la Viande en Pologne", in which production was 
given for 1929-1931... These figures are considerably lower than those used in 
former issues of ''Foreign Crops and Markets" based on an average dressed weight 
officially reported in 1927. 

f/ Includes mea.t produced in the Saar for last quarter. 
g_/ Census, rural communities, 1927-28 and 1929-30. 
h/ Rural communities, season beginning June. 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 721 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AMD BEEF, CONT'D 

MEAT: Estimated per-capita consumption of beef and veal, mutton and lamb, 
and pork and lard, in specified countries, most recent years available • 





Beef 


Mutton 


Pork 




Country and year 


and 


and 


: and 


; Total 




veal 


lamb 


lard 




EXPORTING COUNTRIES a/ 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


; Pound s 


South America 










Argentina" b/ 










1933 


255.0 
262.0 
296.0 


15.0 
16 .0 
16 . 0 


; 14.0 
; 12.0 

; i4.o 


I 284 . 0 
: 290 . 0 
: 325 . 0 




1935 


British. Dominions 


Australia c/ 










1931 


93.0 


80.0 


: n.o 


I 184.0 


19o2 . . . 


109.0 


93.0 


■ 






J. 1U • u 


q/ n 
o4t . u 






"Mpvir 7pnl flVlH ri / 










J.JOJ- *••*..••....«•••••••• 


all ^/i n 


n / Q/i n 
e / i>4t • u 






IJUG « 


f /l oc a. 

I / J.OO . O 

■P /l QO F, 
XJ J. s.c, . D 


ey x uo • u 


&0 , D 


olo . 4 


J- -? o o 


„ /n n n 
ey in. u 




66' J . c 


IJOT: « . • 


I / J-OO . U 




OP. O. 




[ n n O' "1 rr 1 / 

U dJl-iUd (S,/ 










-L J Od 


Do . U 


r .2 


oo . 7 


14o . 9 


Uoo 


55.5 


6 . 1 


75 . 0 


136 .6 


-L 3 O . 


o/.y 


b .o 


OC . 1 


1 /I P. *7 


1935 

IMPORTING CoMTRIES' h/ 


CO . 1 


b .4 


oi . y 


lo4.4 


United States i/ 










1933 


40.1 


5.4 ■ 


57 . 9 


103.4 


1934 


44.1 


. 4.9 




101.2 


1935 • . 


41.4 


5.5 


36 . 5 


83.4 


United Kingdom jj 










1932 


60.5 


31.5 


47 .2 


139 . 2 


1933 . . 


64.2 


30.5 


41. 2 


135 . 9 


1934 


64.6 


29.2 


40.2 


154. 0 


1935 


63 .5 








Germany kj 










1933 


35.9 


1.5 


71.7 


109.1 


1934 


40.5 


1.3 


77.4 


119.2 


1935 


39.9 




67.8 




Prance l/ 










1933 


48.7 


6.5 


38.7 


93.9 


1934 


50.8 


6.7 


39.7 


97.2 


1935 


50.6 


6.6 


41.2 i 


98.4 


Belgium 










1931 . 


39.0 j 


1.3 


48.7 ; 


89.0 


1932 


39.2 i 


1.5 


44.3 ; 


85.0 


1933 


40.7 









722 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 23 



THE 170RID SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



MEAT: Estimated per-capita consumption of "beef and veal, mutton and lamb, 
and pork and lard, in specified countries, most recent years available, 
i cont ' d 





Beef 


Mutton 


Pork 




Country and year 


and 


and 


and 


, To tal 




veal 


lamb 


lard 




IMPORTING COUNTRIES ,h/ CONT'D 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pound, s 


Pounds 


Czechoslovakia m/ 










1932 


28.7 

26.4 
27.4 


7.5 
6.9 
7.5 


36.2 
34.1 
40.0 


72.4 
67.4 
74.9 


1933 


1934 





Compiled from official sources unless otherwise stated. Edible offal not in- 
cluded for the United States and not included for other countries unless speci- 
ficially stated. 

a/ Countries in which exports of beef usually exceed imports arranged in order 
of importance, b/ Estimate includes quantities of beef and veal and mutton and 
lamb consumed on farms. These estimates have been made by subtracting exports 
(including preserved meat with beef) , from estimated production and dividing by 
population, c/ Season beginning July 1. &/ Season beginning April 1. e/ 5-year 
average ended year indicated, fj Estimates based on annual consumption figures di- 
vided by population, gj Lard not included, as production not available. Per- 
capita consumption of lard produced in factories and abattoirs was as follows in 
pounds: 1931, 4.8; 1932, 5.3; 1933, 4.6; 1934, 4.1. h/ Countries in which im- 
ports usually exceed exports arranged in order of importance, excex^t that the 
United States has been placed first for convenience, iy Estimates of consumption 
of Federally Inspected meat only. The estimates for pork (carcass weight) ex- 
clude rendered lard. Per-capita consumption of rendered lard is as follows: 
1933, 7.99; 1934, 7.29; 1935, 4.92. Total per-capita consumption not available 
subsequent to 1932. j_/ For season beginning June 1, includes Irish Free State. 
Years 1932-35 to 1933-34 are revisions of earlier figures published by this 
Bureau and are unofficial estimates based on method of estimating as described 
in the Agricultural Output for England and TTales for 1925 and 1950-31. In the 
recent Output the birth and death rates of. sheep and lambs and hogs have been 
revised as have the average dressed weights. Official estimates of per-capita 
consumption of pork apparently exclude imported lard. Including imported lard, 
unofficial estimates are as follows in pounds: 1932, 53; 1933, 47; 1934, 45. 
k/ Excludes imported fats and edible organs, except in the case of pork which 
for the year 1932 is an estimate furnished by Blatter fur Landwirtschaftliche 
Marktforschung and includes imported fats and edible organs. Estimates for 
pork, including lard, for other years have been obtained by adding net imports 
of pork and pork products to official production and dividing by population. 
Per-capita consumption of lard alone is estimated as follows in pounds: 1932, 
7.6; 1933, 6.6; 1934, 5.8. l/ Estimates based on method used by Dr. Louis G-. 
Michael and published in United States Department, of Agriculture Technical 
Bulletin No. 37, Agricultura.1 Survey of Europe, France, ml Figures for per- 
capita consumption "of all other meats" placed in mutton and lamb column. 
Lard and fat-back consumption was as follows in pounds: 1952, 10.2; 1933, 9.3; 
1954, 10.1. 



December 7, 19,36 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



723 



THE TJ0F.LD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 
United States 

Current prices of beef steers, as reflected "by Chicago quotations, 
are slightly lower than a year ago for the higher grades and higher than 
last year for the lower grades. Monthly slaughter figures for all cattle 
and calves have been running larger than those of a year ago since January 1 
with figures for Chicago showing an unusually large proportion of choice 
steers. Consumer demand shows no sign of weakening. This fact, together 
with the anticipated reduction in supplies of good end choice steers, is 
expected to result in a counter-seasonal upward price movement for such 
steers in the first half of 1937, as was the case in 1935. It is expected 
also that prices of lower—grade steers will make their usual seasonal ad- 
vance in the first half of the new year. The number of all cattle on farms 
as of January 1, 1937, is expected to be somewhat smaller than those of a 
year earlier end considerably smaller than the peak number of 3 years ago. 
Hie figures, however, will be larger than the January 1 average of the past 
15 years. 

The import quota of 155,799 head of low-duty cattle was exhausted 
between November 7 and November 14. By Jane 27, the quota was 83 percent 
utilized. Thereafter, however, imports assumed a more rapid downward trend, 
the quota utilization being only 90 percent by August 8. After that date, 
about 3 months were required to account for the last 10 percent of the quota. 
Receipts of quota cattle from Mexico have been negligible since the end of 
August. The final distribution of quota imports as between Canada and 
Mexico will not be ready for some time. The table on page 724 summarizes all 
available cattle quota figures. 

Total imports of dutiable cattle and calves in the first 9 months 
of 1935 reached 354,276 head against 268,967 head in 1935. Practically all 
of the increase occurred in quota cattle weighing 700 pounds or more, and 
in quota, calves weighing less than 175 pounds. All of the increase over 
last year came from Canada. Imports from Mexico fell below last year's 
figures because of the smaller movement of cattle weighing less than 700 
pounds but more than 175 pounds. If total monthly import figures for October, 
November, and December are no larger than the September total, imports for 
1936 will be little more than 50,000 head larger than the 1935 total. 

Imports of canned beef for the first 9 months of 1935 were about 
28 percent larger than in the corresponding 1935 period. In most months 
of the current year, imports from Uruguay have been somewhat larger than 
imports from Argentina. The 1936 figures indicate a maintenance of the up- 
ward trend in canned beef imports in evidence since 1931. The import duty 
on this item has not been changed from the rate of 6 cents per pound estab- 
lished in 1930, 



724 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No 



THE 170 ELD SITUATION IN CATTLE AMD BEEF, CONT'D 

The relatively small export trade of the United States in "beef was 
reduced further in 1936, In all three items (fresh or frozen, canned, and 
pickled) the 1935 record was smaller than that of 1934, though the 1935 ex- 
ports of fresh and canned beef were somewhat larger than the very small 
figures of most recent years. The more important pickled- "beef item, how- 
ever, was smaller than for any other recent year except 1932. 

UNITED STATES: Imports of dutiable cattle and calves under 
the quotas, January 1 - November 14, 1936 





Calves weighing 


Cattle weighing 


Dairy cows 


Item 




less than 




700 pounds 


weighing 700 






175 pounds 




and over 


pounds & over 


Quotas for 1936 




51,933 


155,799 


20,000 






51,933 




155,799 


5,382 


Percent of qu^ta used 




100.0 




100.0 


26.9 


Number imported from Canada. . 


a/ 


48 , 682 


*/ 


134,247 


5,382 


Percent of imports 












received from Canada 


a/ 


95.6 


$>/ 


86.4 


100.0 


Number imported from Mexico.. 


11 


2,238 


\l 


21,119 


0 


Percent of imports 














a/ 


4.4 


*/ 


13.6 


0 



Compiled from official records of the United States Customs Bureau, 
a/ Figures are for period January 1 - August 1, 1936. Customs Bureau has 
not yet worked out final allocations as between Canada and Mexico, 
b/ Figures are for period January 1 - November 7, 1936. Also not yet allocated. 

UNITED STATES: Imports of cattle, free of duty, by countries, 

1931 - 1935 a/ 



Country from 



Year ended December 31 



which imported 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


CATTLE, IMPORTED 
FH3E OF DUTY j 

Other countries 


Number 

6,505 

862 
285 
2,224 

'8 


Number 

6,769 
638 
169 

1,633 
0 


Number 

4,957 

299 
63 
1,613 
1 


Number 

5,608 
1,237 
15 
1,765 

0 


Number 

13,066 
280 
146 

b/ 2 , 757 

g 


9,885 


9,209 


6,933 


8,625 


16,258 



Compiled from Comparative Statistics of Imports into the United States for 
Consumption, by the United States Tariff Commission. 

a/ Total imports for the first 9 months 'of 1936 reached 7,775 head against 
10,118 head for the corresponding 1935 period (excluding those from the 
Virgin Islands) . 

b/ Beginning January 1, 1935, the Virgin Islands have beftn designated as a 
customs district of the United States. 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



725 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 

CATTLE: Dutiable imports into the United States from Canada and Mexico , 
by months, January-September , 195 5 and 19 36 _ 



: 700 pounds and over ; Under 700 pounds } 

Country, year ; . : ♦ : Less :175 to : : Total 

and month : Dair y : others: Total jthari 175 : 699 : Total tdutiable 

. « cows . 2 ; p ounds : pound s : ; cattle 

CANADA : „ ♦ Number: Numbe r: Number: Number : Number : Number : Number 

1935 - January : "^T""""": 1,274: ' a/ : a/ : 173: 1,447 

February . ..; a/ : a./ ; 3,502: a/ : a/ : 677: 4,179 

March ; a/ : a/ ; 11,390: a/ : . a/ : 4,381: 15,771 

April .; a/ : a/ ' : 13,487: a/ : a/ : 5,443: 18,930 

May . . . ; a/ : a/ ; 14,142: a/ : a/ : 6,611: 20,753 

June ....... t a/ ; a/ : 6,450: a/ : a/ : 4,858: 11,318 

July .1 a/ : tj ; 2,483; ay : a/ : 3,670: 6,153 

August a/ 2 a/ * 1,987; 8 a/ t 3,531: 5,518 

September a/ : a/ } 2,056: a/ ; a/ : 7.,346: 9 , 402 

Total . ...» "ay | &/ t 56,781;' a/ [ a / : .3 6,690; 93,471 

1936 - January 290; 8,574$ 8 y 8S4: 896 j ' 832: 1,728s 10,592 

February ..,; l81t 8,683: 3,854; 1,230? 509; v 1,739: 10,603 

March ...... j 200$ 14,351s 14,851: 2,141s 905;*" 3,046* 17,897 

April t 326: 34,501; $4,827: 6,425l 3,2501 9,675; 44,502 

May 920: 23,731: 24,651? 9,054? 2,329t 11,383; 36,034 

June ........ 764 j. 20 ,733: 21,502; 14,337s 2,548: 16 ',885; 38,387 

•July ...... ,j 564$ 8,543: 9,207; 14,198: 2,406., 16,604; 25,811 

August ..„,,.» §35| 5,035; 5,870; 2,631; 4,034 ; 6,665} 12,535 

September i . I ■ 815? 7 ,,902:^ 8 ,71 7; 1,554^6.248; 7^602; 16 ? 3l9 

1 fotal: . . . . t 4,S9lTi^74 ^ ;> 3&3-3 , ^35^? , 52,2 6 6 8 23, 0§ Is* 7 5 1 32 7; 212,680 , 

MEXICO ! .... J . i" .' . ... % t . j J : 

1935 January ...«; a/ • ay" : 68; a/ j a/ j 4,313s 44,381 
February ...j a/ ; a/ t 22: a/ ; a/ -j 33 , 556 ? 35^558 

March : e/ j a/ : 52: a/ : a/ j 36,088: 36,150 

April : a/ ; a/ ; 770: a/ t a/ ; 29,733 : 30,503 

May ,..: a/ j a/ j 242; ej : ' a/ s 26,062: 26,304 

June ; a/ j a/ ; 946j g/ : a/ ; 19,581: 20,527 

July : a/ ; a/ t 194? a/ : a/ j 10,652: 10,846 

August .....; a/ ; a/ : 514: a/ ; a/ I 9,215: 9,750 

September .,; e/ ; a/ ; 49; "a/ : a/ ; 3 , 419: 5,46 8 

Total ....: a'/ : a/ : 2,8G7: &/ ; g"T : 1727 *60 0:: 175,467 

1936 - January 0: 2,319; 2,319: 161; 8,338:. 8,499: 10,818 

February ...: Oj 3,301: 3,301: 32: 13,819: 13,851: 17,152 

March : 0; 5,855; 5,355; 33: 27,195; 27,228: 33,083 

April ......: 0; 3,191: 3,191: 259: 30,372: 30,631: 33,822 

May • 0; 4,027; 4,027; 128: 14,727; 14,855: 18,882 

June ; 6; 666; 666: 12: 7,096: 7,108: 7,774 

July : 0; 1,306; 1,306: 881: 5,346; 6,227: 7,53^ 

August .....; 6l 557: 557: 93: 5,347: 5,440: 5,997 

September ..: Qt 45; 45; 9: 5,775: 5,782: 5,827 

_^ Total ..«.; 0; 21,267; 21,267; 1,608:118,013:119,621: 140,883 

a/ Not classified prior to January 1, 1936. 



726 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Yol. 33, Ho. 23 



Tiffin WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEE, CONT'D 

BELT, CANNED , INCLUDING CORNED B3EE: Imports (for consumption) into the 
United Stages, annual, 3 931-1935 and monthly, 1934, 1935 and 1936 



Tear ended 
December 31 



Country from 'which importe d 



Argentina : Un guay 



1, 000 



9,731 

15,798 
21,278 

392 
445 
1.097 
2,851 
2,291 
1,714 
2 S 867 
4,691 
2,503 
3,162 
3,023 



1,000 

murLds_ 

892 
586 
1,158 

70 
120 
61 
8 
85 
81 
15 
105 
30 
4 
8 

22. 



1,000 

19,586 
24,639 
41,344 

1,568 
* 1,344 
2,995 
3,782 
3,470 
2,519 
4,279 
6,195 
4,227 
4,586 

m 



2- ,595 



619 



4§;674 



1,133 
2,288 
4,526 
6,224 
3,90$ 
3,124 
2,753 
2,442 
3,934 
3,092 
3,591 



108 
41 
91 
79 
33 
299 
229 
597 
376 
571 
555 
A2Z. 



4-1 9 



4,099 
4,222 
7,690 
9,496 
7,076 
5,S11 
5,220 
5,740 
7,752 

5,379 
6,811 



5,136 
4,417 
4,408 
5,787 
5,101 
4,010 
4,263 

3,795 
3.273 



284 
125 
228 
22l 
74 
41 
110 

97 
145 



7,642 
7,218 
7,978 
11,897 
8,654 
7,034 
7,506 
8,938 
6.439 



1,000 

dollars. 
2,323 
2,128 
2,677 

121 
97 

198 

231 
181 
252 
362 
269 
281 
P7P 



3 , 015 



285 
289 
519 
647 
506 
419 
370 
411 
564 
375 
565 
..6,07. 



769 
710 
811 
1,140 

824 
659 
701 
838 
613 



. 1,000 

Annual. - . i ^ 

19 31 j 8,963 

19 32 : 8,255 

19 33 : 18.908 

,1931 - j 

January ; • 1,106 

February * 779 

March .' : 1,837 

April i 923 

May ; 1,004 

June . . . . • 724 

July i 1,397 

August : 1,399 

September : 1,694 

October J 1,420 

November j 1,409 

December ..... 3 '630 

Total ; 17,452 

1935 - ; 
January « 2,853 

. February j 1,893 

March , . . 2,979 

April ; 3,193 

May 3,135 

June : 2,488 

July ; 2,238 

August j 2,?6l 

September .....j 3,442 

October J 1,716 

November I 2,665 

December . . . . . .i 2»4 3g_ 

Total : 31.743 

1936 ~ : 

January i 2,222 

February i 2,673 

March ! 3,342 

April • 5,889 

May • 3,479 

fee • 2,983 

July i 3,133 

August J 5,045 

September ; 3.021 

Compiled from official records of the United States Tariff Commission and the 

Bureau of Eoreign and Domestic Commerce. 



Other 
countries 



Total 



Total 
value 



Unit 
value per 
:>oand 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

THE tfORLD SITUATION IK CATTLE AND BEEP, CONT'D 
UNITED STATES: Exports of beef and veal, by countries, 1931-1935 



727 



Commodity and country • 
to which exported 



Year ended December 31 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



1935 



FRESH OR FROZEN: • 

United Kingdom ■ 

Mexico j 

Netherland YT. Indies i 

Bermudas ; 

British I. Indies ; 

Canada < 

Panama , . I 

Philippine Islands i 

Other countries ; 

Total • 

CANNED : \ 

United Kingdom . j 

Philippine Islands : 

Newf oundland & Labrador ; 

Canada J 

British West Indies... ) 

Netherland ''West Indie's. ...... * 

British South Africa, ........ t ! 

Mexico ; 

Panama j 

Other countries. • \ 

Total | 

PICKLED AND OTHER CUBED: 



Newfoundland & Labrador { 

Norway j 

Canada , . j 

British West Indies . f 

French West Indies. j 

United Kingdom. j 

Netherland We at Indies.. i 

(Jermany i 

Surinam , | 

Panama. , '. j 

Other countries. j 

Total 

TOTAL BEEF AND "VEAL 



1,000 
pounds 
192 
372 
280 
433 
196 
56 
384 
56 
114 



2,083 



1,018 
76 
30 
61 
25 
39 
27 
11 
10 
181 



1,478 



8,066 
368 
. 416 
398 

1,362 
265 
367 
234 
131 
170 

1,245 



13,Q22 



1,000 
pounds 
1 

267 
314 
321 

89 
6 

529 
63 
43 



- 1,000 
pounds 
73 
247 
384 
328 
105 
2 

1,039 
514 
206 



1,633 



2,898 



729 
59 
35 
13 

3 
35 
22 

7 
13 
82 



851 
52 
42 
22 
16 
27 
32 
10 
• 18 
132 



1,003 



1,202 



6,862 
320 
115 
160 

1,339 
106 
303 
192 

8 

375 



8,520 
474 
142 
559 

1,586 
223 
22$ 
343 
114 
57 
591 



1,000 
pounds 
109 
296 
374 
532 
196 
5 

2,162 
1,579 
507 
5,460 



2,085 
32 
44 

ii 

9 
61 

46 
14 

24 
158 



2,484 



8,803 
697 

si 

776 
1,661 

283 
176 
181 

98 
"56 
1,128 



9,868 



12,734 



13,940 



1,000 
p ound s 
56 
205 
280 
328 
144 
4 

1,617 

2,099 
105 



4,838 



1,735 
36 
21- 
11 
7 
91 
47 
9 
17 
136 
"2 , 110 



4,125 
354 
31 
94 
383 
67 
61 
78 
17 
47 
395 
5,662 



16,583 



12,504 



16,834 



21,884 



12,610 



Compiled from Foreign Commerce and Navigation of the United States, 1931-1934, 
and official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce* 



728 




Foreign 


Crops and Markets 


Vol. 33, 


No. 23 




THE TDHLD SITUATION IN CATTLE 


AND BEEE, 


CONT 1 D 




UNITED ST^TS 


S: Averag 


e monthly price per 100 pounds of 


medium "beef steers, 


all 


weights , 


oU LU ULlb Ui 






o for slaughter 


Month • 




1 1 ' ' " 

1932 


1933 


! 1934 




i ■ 

' 1 9^6 




Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


: Dollars 


: 

•Jan * 


8.72 


o . 04 


A A rr 

4.43 


4.68 


7.60 


: 8.18 


j e o ; 


7.91 


6 »00 


4*66 


5.20 


8.35 


• 7.78 


ilar ; 


7.97 


6. 06 


4.89 


5.37 


9.48 


: 7.93 


Apr ; 


7.46 


6.15 


A f A 

4.64 


5.69 


9.89 


7.77 


May ; 


7.05 


5.59 


5.21 


5.89 


9.84 


7.44 


June • •»......• 


6.95 


6.17 


5.24 


5.88 


9.13 


7.25 


July : 


7 .01 


7.06 


5.32 


5.39 


8.48 


7.45 


Aug : 


7.52 


6.94 . 


5. IS 


5.52 


8,44 • 


7.33 


bepo 


6.82 


6.88 


5.19 


5.97 


8.62 


7.85 


Oct : 


6.94 


5.90 


4.62 


5.62 


8.54 


8.14 


Nov : 


6.99 


5»38 


4.32 


5.39 


8'»2X 




Dec ! 


6.18 


4.63 


4 >43 


5c74 


8,23 ' 




Average . . . »• 


7.39 


r 1 1 

5.9B 


4.91 


5.53 


8,80 i 





Canada 

Cattle numbers in Canada have fluctuated within relatively narrow 
limits in recent years. Since 1934 the trend has been slightly downward, with 
total numbers as of June l s 1936, about 1.4 percent below the 1934 level. The 
figores for total numbers have followed the same trend as the annual estimates 
of the number of cows expected to produce calves in the months December-June. 
The current /feed situation and increased slaughter suggests that calving in. 
the period Dec ember --June 1935-37 will be smaller than in any of the 3 preced- 
ing years. 

Peed grains are officially estimated to be in short supply this season. 
Forage crops also turned out smaller than in 1935. and below the average for 
the period 1930 to 1934. An uneven distribution gives eastern Canada a sur- 
plus of feedstuffs, while from western Ontario westward a deficit is in evidence 
In general, it is expected that fewer animals will be fed to heavy weights 
this winter than last. It is probable, therefore, that, as in the United 
States, slaughter supplies of well-finished cattle will be smaller in the 
first half of 1937 than in the corresponding 1936 period. If demand continues 
to be maintained, an upward price movement in the first half of 1937 appears 
to be in prospect for Canada as well as for the United States. The amount of 
spread between Canadian and American prices will influence to a considerable 
extent the movement of Canadian cattle to the United States. 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



729 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BESE, CONT'D 

Total exports of cattle and calves from Canada in the first 9 months of 
1936 reached 249,000 head, an increase of over 100 percent over the correspond- 
ing 1935 figures. Exports this year have been the largest since 1929. The 
movement to the United States is reflected in the foregoing figures on United 
States imports. Imports of Canadian cattle into the United Kingdom during 
the first 9 months of 1936 also increased considerably to reach 32,766 head. 
The 1935 comparable figure was 6,454 head. The future of this trade depends 
largely upon the effect of British cattle- sub sidy plans upon British live- 
cattle prices and upon their relation to cattle prices in the United States. 

Total beef exports from Canada in the first 9 months of 1936, at 
5,656,000 pounds, represent a decline of 51 percent from the corresponding 
1935 movement. In recent years the limited Canadian beef exports went largely 
to Great Britain. In 1935 and 1936, however, about half of the beef exports 
came to the United States, with the United Kingdom in second position. Canada 
ranks after Australia, New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa as a British 
Empire exporter of beef. There is a small Canadian import trade in beef, the 
annual volume in recent years being less than 200,000 pounds. New Zealand 
and the United States are the leading sources of supply. 

CANADA: Monthly average price, United States currency, per 100 pounds 
of good and choice beef steers over 1,050 pounds 
at Toronto and Winnipeg, 1932-1936 



Month 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 




1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 aj 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


JL936 a/ 




Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 




lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


Jan 


5.01 


3.59 


5.51 


5.55 


6.29 


4.44 


3.18 


4.13 


4.18 


4.81 


Eeb 


5.10 


3.34 


5.78 


5.94 


6.30 


4.29 


2.73 


4.46 


5.07 


4.28 


Mar 


5.22 


3.64 


5.98 


6.74 


5.48 


4.54 


3.10 


4.89 


5.83 


4.58 


Apr 


5.28 


4.07 


6.06 


7.08 


5.48 


4.60 


3.20 


4.98 


6.26 


4.60 


May 


5.16 


4.43 


5.85 


7.19 


5.16 


4.55 


3.78 


4.93 


6.81 


4.41 


June 


5.34 


4.58 


5.61 


6.75 


5.32 


4.57 


3.87 


4.74 


6.21 


4.43 


July 


5.35 


4.54 


5.43 


6.39 


5.33 


4.43 


4.08 


4.20 


5.65 


4.48 


Aug 


5.30 


4.43 


5.51 


6.54 


5.34 


4.11 


3.20 


3.92 


5.38 


4.93 


Sept . 


4.84 


4.34 


5.46 


6.75 


5.55 


3.76 


3.08 


3.59 


4.72 


4.73 


Oct 


4.29 


4.20 


5.15 


5.98 




3.31 


2.67 


3.37 


4.42 




Nov 


3.68 


4.52 


4.90 


5.74 




3.06 


3.41 


3.54 


4.69 




Dec 


3.55 


5.12 


5.45 


6.27 




2.79 


3.71 


3. 85 


4.83 




Yearly 






















average 


4.90 


4.23 


5.56 


6.41 




4.38 


3.33 


4.22 


5.34 





Compiled from Livestock Market and Meat Trade Review. 

a/ In 1936 prices are given for both choice and good but quotations are for 
good from January 1936 to date, as bulk of sales are for good. 



730 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Ho. 23 

THE T70RLD SITUATION IK CATTLE AMD BEES 1 , CONT'D 

CANADA: Number of cattle and calves in important eastern and western 
Provinces .and in all Canada, 1930-1936 



Date of 



Principal 
eastern Provinces 



Principal 
re stern provinces 



estimate 








Mani- 
toba 


Sas- 






Total 


June I 


Ontario 


Quebec 


Total 


katch- 
ewan 


Alberta 


Total 


Canada 




Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 


Thou- 




sands 


sands 


sands 


sands 


aansLs,. 








1930 ... 


2, 576 


2,019 


4,695 


735 


1,215 


1,288 


3,238 


8,937 


1931 ... 


2,514 


1,707 


4,221 


669 


1,189 


1,125 


2,983 


7,973 


1932 . . . 


2,529 


1,877 


4,405 


734 


1,328 


1,224 


3,286 


8,511 


1933 ... 


2,524 


1,760 


4,284 


' 806 


1,445 


1,472 


3,724 


8,876 


1934 ... 


2,494 


1,725 


4,220 


' 795 • 


X * 5 0* x 


1,570 


3,869 


8,952 


1935 ... 


2,469 


1,662 


4,131 


760 


1,485 


1,604 


3,850 


8,321 


1936 a/. 


2,474 


1,696 


. 4,170 


746 




1 ; 536 


3> 315 


8,319 



Compiled from Monthly Bulletin of Agricultural Statistics, 
a/ Preliminary. 



CANADA: Number of cows to calve in important eastern and western Frovinces, 

December-June 1932-33 to 1935-36 



Dec. 

to 
June 


Principal 
eastern Frovinces 


Principal 
western Provinces 


Total 
Canada 


Ontario 


Quebec 


Total 


Mani- 
toba 


'Sas- 
katch- 
ewan 


Alberta 


Total 




Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


Thou- 
sands 


1932- 33 

1933- 34 

1934- 35 

1935- 36 


846 
861 
835 
810 


' 960 
995 
957 
972 


1,806 
1,856 
1,792 
1,782 


218 
225 

208 

(Coo 


488 
560 
492 
467 


475 
617 
550 
541 


1,181 
1,402 
1,260 
1,231 


3,275 
3,5(7 
3,372 
3, 321 



Compiled from Monthly Bulletin of Agricultural Statistics. 



December 7, 1936 foreign Crops and Markets 731 

THE T70RLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEE?, CONT'D 

CANADA: Number of cattle on hand and exports of cattle and calves, 
average 1924-1923, annual 1929-1935 



Year 
ended 
Dec .31 


Number 
on hand 
June 1 


Cattle exported : 


Calves exported 


To the 

T Tti t 4* a 
UI1X b cd 

Kingdom 


To the ; m n : 

United Total ' 
C4 . , • exports 
States ; ± 


To the 

TTn -i +■ orl 

uju v e'j. 
States 


Tin t ai 


Total- 
cattle & 
calves 
exported 




Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousands '• Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousands 


Thous ands 


Av. 1924-23 


9,061 


56 


130 : 190 


63 


64 


254 


1929 


8,825 




160 : 163 


90 


91 


254 


1930 


8,937 


5 


19 i 28 


35 


36 


64 


1931 


7,973 


27 


'9 i 40 


15 


16 


56 


1932 


8,511 


17 


9 28 


A 


5 


33 


1933 


3,876 


50 


6 i 59 


f 


. 1 


60 


1934 


8,952 


54 


6 ! 63 




1 


64 


1935 


8,821 


7 


103 ; 113 


21 


213 


135 



Compiled from Livestock Market and Meat Trade Review, 
a/ Less than 500. 



CANADA: Cattle slaughter, production and export of "beef, average 1924-1938, 

annual. 1929-1935 



Year 



Inspected! Total 
slaughter; slaughter 
cattle and cattle an 
calvos : calves 



Total 
beef and 
veal pro- 
duction 



Exports of beef and veal to 



Great 
Britain 



United 
States 



Total 
e xpo rts 



Thousands JTJaousahdg 



Av. 1924-28 '; 

1929 | 

1930 ' *| 

1931 «..««.««•■•• j 

1932 j 

1933 j 

1934 j 

1935 ! 



1,051 j 
1,117 ; 



937 • 
1,092 j 
1,347 : 
1,377 I 



1,926 
1,954 
1,904 
1,702 
1,669 
1,715 
2,137 
2,036 



1 , 000 



639,379- 
693,457 
67f:,S81 
602,^.7 
592, 565 
608,976 
758,310 
722,673 



5,222 
6 

243 
524 
1,479 
7,173 
11,494 
3,818 



1,000 
gliuniis_ 

25,455 
28,666 
4,938 
352 
381 
170 
379 
5,986 



1,000 
pou nd s. 

37,790 
31,066 
8,086 
3,756 
4,436 
10,010 
15,092 
13,513 



Compiled from Livestock and Animal Products Statistics; Livestock Market and 
Meat Trade Review. 



732 



Foreign Crops a,nd Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 23 



Tilt, t/CKLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 

South Americ a n bee f -e xpo rting countr ies 

The British policy of restricting imports of foreign beef has resulted 
in various readjustments in South American countries to meet the new con- 
ditions. Some liquidation of cattle numbers has taken place in the past 3 
years as indicated by the increased percentage of cows and calves slaughtered 
and the reduction of 4 percent in Argentine cattle numbers between 1930 and 
1934. It is believed that oat tie numbers in Argentina and Uruguay continued 
to increase until 1932 but since that date have been decreasing. The li- 
quidation which has taken place, however, has not been as great as in the 
years 1923-1926 although cattle prices in 1932 and 1933 fell to even lower 
levels than in 1922 and 1925. 

Readjustments by the South American countries to the British policy 
have been made in three ways: first, promotion of domestic consumption by 
supplying "better beef for the domestic trade; second, readjustment of ex- 
port markets; and, third, the diversion of a larger proportion of cattle 
into the canned-meat trade. Generally, it may be said that any loss of 
market for chilled or frozen beef has been almost entirely compensated 
by an increase in exports of canned meat. New markets have been found for 
this latter product. There was a marked decrease in total beef exports in 
1933, out since then they have been increasing, principally as the result 
of the increase in canned or preserved beef. The higher United States 
cattle and beef prices in 1955 and 1936 stimulated the upward movement of 
South American canned beef exports. 

Argentina 

The total number of cattle and calves slaughtered in Argentina has 
inc.rea.sed each year since 1952 and the quantity killed for domestic consump- 
tion has become an increasingly larger percentage of the total. Those fig- 
ures advanced from 61 percent of the total in 1928 to 68 percent in 1932 
and to 70 percent in each of the past 3 years. 

One of the noticeable features of cattle slaughter is the reduction 
in the percentage of steers slaughtered and the increa.se in the percentages 
of cows and calves. The percentage of steers slaughtered fell from 63 in 
1932 to 58 in 1935, whereas the percentage of cows and calves increased from 
37.4 in 1932 to 41.7 in 1935. In the 4 years 1923 to 1926, however, slaughter 
of cows and calves averaged as high as 48,5 percent of the total. 

In the last year, Argentine freezing companies have purchased a larger 
proportion of steers than formerly at Liniers Market, Buenos Aires. Pur- 
chases by freezing companies at Liniers in the first 6 months of 1936 
amounted to 34 percent of their total purchases compared with only 27 per- 
cent for the same period of 1935. In 1935, purchases at liniers amounted 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



733 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEE, CONT'D 

to 33 percent of the total compared with only 25 percent in 1932. The per- 
centage purchased by freezing companies at ranches has shown a corresponding 
reduction- 

The increased operations of freezing companies in the Liniers market 
appear to be related to greater participation by such organizations in the 
domestic beef trade. Not more than 5 percent of the steers suitable for the 
export trade in chilled beef are purchased at Liniers, the balance coming 
direct from ranches. It is likely, also, that operations at Liniers of the 
semiofficial packing plant established in 1933 have contributed materially 
to the volume of Liniers purchases recorded as being made "by freezing companies 

The larger volume of business at Liniers has been accompanied by a 
sharper upward movement in prices at that market than at the ranches. In 
the first 6 months of 1936 the average price of exceptional chilled-beef 
steers was $4.10 per 100 pounds against $2.97 in the corresponding 1935 
period, representing an advance of $1.13. The average price paid by freez- 
ing companies at ranches in the 1936 period was $4.15, an advance of 52 
cents over the comparable 1935 average. The 1936 figures represent an un- 
usually small advance in ranch prices over Liniers prices. The ranch prices, 
however, continue to reflect the value of much the larger number of steers 
entering the chilled-beef export trade. 

By June 1936, the latest month for which detailed figures are avail- 
able, the average ranch price paid for all steers by freezing companies 
stood at $4.00 per 100 pounds. That figure represented a gain of 71 cents 
over the June 1935 average and of $1.52 over the low average for June reached 
in 1932. Most types of steers shared in the 1936 advance. There was a rise 
of 13 percent over June 1935 in the price paid for chilled-beef steers, an 
increase of 70 percent in the frozen-beef type, and one of 78 percent in 
the butcher type largely entering domestic consumption. There was a decline 
of 13 percent in the average for "conserva", or cutter and canner steers. 
There are indications that this latter classification of relatively low-grade 
steers represents a smaller proportion of the canned beef exports than it 
did a few years ago. 

In the first 6 months of 1936, beef exports from Argentina were 7 
percent above those of the same period a year earlier. Chilled beef ex- 
ports in the first 6 months of 1936, amounting to 386,000,000 pounds, in- 
creased 5 percent above those of the previous year, frozen beef at 50,205,000 
pounds increased 56 percent, and preserved beef at 82,805,000 pounds increased 
4 percent. The large increase in frozen beef exports was almost entirely due 
to an increase in purchases by Germany. 

Exports of all kinds of beef from Argentina in the calendar year 1935 
were only 1 percent smaller than in 1932. Whereas there was a reduction of 6 
percent in exports of chilled beef, most of which went to the United Kingdom, 
and a reduction of 16 percent in exports of frozen beef, there was an increase 
of 52 percent in exports of preserved and canned beef. This shift to canned 
meat exports may be exoected to continue as rani.dlv as markets can "hp developed 



734 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 23 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEP, CONT'D 

The decline in the chilled "beef exports since 1332 represents almost 
entirely a decrease in shipments to the United Kingdom. Exports of frozen "beef 
to the United Kingdom and France declined, "but there was an increase in exports 
to Germany and Italy. Shipments of canned and preserved meat to the United 
Kingdom and to the United States have increased from the low point reached 
in 1932. Exports of this type to the United Kingdom increased 14 percent to 
75,000,000 pounds in 1935. Exports to the United States advanced to 38 ,'000,000 
pounds in 1935 from 11,000,000 pounds in 1932, with another increase in pros- 
pect for 1936. 

Urugua y 

Domestic consumption now accounts for a larger share of slaughter in 
Uruguay than formerly. Along with this development is a tendency to slaughter 
a larger proportion of younger animals. Indications are for a 1936 slaughter 
somewhat smaller than the unusually heavy 1935 killings. Receipts of cattle 
and calves at North Stork Yards, Montevideo, in the first 8 months of 1935 
amounted to 581,000 head, a decrease of 18 percent as compared with the same 
period of 1935. 

The slaughter of cattle and calves at packing plants and for domestic 
consumption in 1935 is estimated at 1,309,000, an increase of 18 percent 
above 1934 and 40 percent above 1932. The increase in slaughter for all 
purposes in 1935, continued the annual increases noted since 1932. The largest 
percentage increases have occurred in canned-meat and salting plants, although 
the total number is small compared with the number killed in freezing plants 
and for domestic consumption. In 1935 receipts at Montevideo amounted to 
991,000, an increase of 12 percent above 1934. Receipts have increased each 
year from 1932, when they were estimated at 690,000 head. 

Although there was a slight decrease in total exports of beef from 
Uruguay between 1932 and 1934, the decrease in exports of chilled and frozen 
"beef to the United Kingdom have been almost entirely offset by an increase 
in canned meat exports to the United Kingdom, the United States, and other 
markets. In 1935, statistics of exports for the first 10 months indicate 
that the total may exceed that of 1934 and may also exceed exports in 1932 
when they amounted to 190,000,000 pounds. 

Exports of chilled beef from Uruguay declined 32 percent between 1931 
and 1934. A still further decrease is indicated for the year 1935, accord- 
ing to statistics for the first 10 months, which show a decrease of 8 percent 
compared with the same period of 1934. The year 1930 was the largest for 
chilled beef exports, when they amounted to 93,000,000 pounds. Frozen beef 
exports declined 46 percent between 1931 and 1934. In the first 10 months 
of 1935, however, there was an increase of 12 percent. There has been an 
increase in preserved or canned meat exports, which are believed to be prin- 
cipally beef, since 1932. No export figures for 193S are available, "but 
it is likely that they will show increases in exports of canned and jerked 
beef and little or no increase in chilled and frozen beef. 



December 7, 1935 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



735 



THE T70RLD SITUATION IN CATTJ-3 AMD BESE, CONT'D 

Brazil 

Cattle estimates in Brazil, as well as in other important beef -producing 
countries of South America, are not available annually and for that reason it 
is difficult to ascertain the trend in numbers in the last few years. Esti- 
mates of numbers for 1931 range from 45,000,000 to 47,000,000, and those for 
1932 from 43,000,000 to 48,000,000, which indicates a considerably larger 
number on hand than at the time of the 1920 census when the number was placed 
at 34,271,000 head. Statistics which have recently become available from 
official sources show an increase in cattle and calf slaughter from 2,626,000 
head in 1932 to 3,404,000 in 1934, an increase of 30 percent. 

In 1935, exports of all kinds of chilled and frozen meat amounted to 
119,000,000 pounds and were larger than for any year since 1931- Assuming 
that beef constituted the same percentage cf the total in 1935 that it did 
in 1934, exports of frozen and chilled beef in 1935 amounted to approximately 
99,000,000 pounds, an increase of 30 percent above 1934 and 13 percent above 
1932. In the 10- year period 1926 to 1935, the year cf largest exports was 
1930 when 119,000,000 pounds of chilled and frozen beef were exported from 
Brazil. Large quantities of jerked end dried beef are produced in the State 
of Rio G-rande do Sul and much of it is shipped to other states for consumption. 
Exports of that kind of beef in 1935 amounted to 1,098,000 pounds and were 
2 percent smaller than in 1934 but almost twice as large as in 1932. Only 
small quantities of Brazilian meat come to the United States, and the bulk 
of that is in the preserved or canned form. 



BRAZIL: Exports of beef, annual 1931-1935 



Commodity 


Tear ended December 31 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 
p'relim. 




1,000 


1, 00 0 


1,000 


1 , 000 


1,000 


Jerked and dried 


pounds 


pjmnds_ 


pounds 


pounds 


./gcunds . 




2,324 


631 


36 S 


1,120 


l s 098 


Beef, chilled or 




146,989 


87 , 931 


83,378 


75,946 


a/ 





Compiled from Commercio Exterior do Brazil (Resumo per mercadarias) ; Com- 

mercio Exterior do Brazil, December issue, 1935, and International Institute 

of Agriculture. 
i J 

a/ Included in frozen and chilled meats. 



736 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 23 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND DEEP , CONT'D 
ARGENTINA: Cattle purchased "by freezing companies from different sources, 









1927 


to 1935 














Purchased at 










Ranches 


Liniers market , 
Buenos Aires 


Other sources, \ 
fairs, Rosario, etc- 


Total 




Number 


Share of 
total 


Number 


Share of 
total 


Number 


Share of , 
total : 






Thousands 


Percent 


Thousands 


Percent 


Thousands 


Percent ! 1 


,000 head 


1927 


2,085 


60 


1,067 


33 


82 


7 • 


3,234 


1S28 


1,703 


60 


1,028 


36 


87. 


4 : 


2,818 


1929 


1,733 


62 


946 


34 


112 


4 j 


2,791 


1930 


1,748 


65 


829 


31 


98 


4 : 


2,675 


1931 


1,704 


72 


551 


24 


54 


4 : 


2,309 


1932 


1, 617 


72 


580 


26 


55 


2 : 


2,252 


1933 


1,608 


68 


672 


28 


83 


4 : 


2,363 


1934 


1,733 


67 


741 


29 


104 


4 • 


2,578 


1935 


1,707 


63 


888 


33 


136 


4 : 


2,731 



Compiled from records of the Junta Nacional de Carnes, Division de Contralor. 



ARGENTINA: Slaughter of cattle for consumption and export, 
. 1926 to 1935 





Cattle and calves 


Year : 


Por 








domesti c 


Eor export 


Total 




consumption 








Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousands 


1926 


3,979 


2,819 


6,798 


1927 


3,781 


2,996 


6,777 


1928 


3,808 


2,458 . 


6 , 266 ■ 


1929 


3,838 


2,300 


6,138 


1930 


3,828 


2,138 


5,966 


1931 


3,604 


1,779 


5,333. , 




3,654 


1,690 


5,344 


1933 


3,985 


1,718 


5,703 


1934 


; 4,208 


1,794 


6,002 


1935 


; 4,453 


1,946 


6,399 



Compiled from Anuario Agropecuario 1932, Direccion de Economia rural y Esta- 
distica. ALmana.que del Ministerio de Agricultura de la Nacion 1934. Anuario 
Estadistica, 1935. 



December 7, 1936 .•• ' Foreign Crops and Markets 737 

THE VOKLD SITUATION IK CATTLE AID BEEF, CONT'D 

ARGENTINA: -Slaughter of cattle according to classification, 
. - - •• 1930-1935 





Steers 


; ' COW 


s 


Calves 




Year ■ 




Percent- 




Percent- 




percent- 


. Total 




Number 


age of 


Number 


age of . 


Number 


. .age of 








'total 




"total 




total 






Thou sends 


Percent 


Thousands 


Percent 


Thousands 


. Percent- 


Thousands 


1930. . /. . 


I'V-- 3,296 


' 5'-5.2" 


' 1,986 


' 33.3 ■ 


684 • 


11.5 


5,966 


1931 


3,130 


'.. 58.1 


1.701 • 


31. 6 . 


552 


. - ■ 10-. 3- • 


5,383 


1932 


■ 3,344 


62. 6' 


1,431 


. 26.8 


569 


... 10, 6 


■ -5,344' 


1933. . . ; . 


'3,339 


' 58.6' 


1,739' 


"30.4; 


627 


- 11.0 . 


5,703 


1934. . . ; . 


• 3,512 


- 58.5' 


1,839' 


30.6". 


'. 651 


, . .10.9. 


. 6,002 


1935. . . ; . 


3,728 


58.3 


1,985 


' 31.0 


686 


. 10.7 


6,399 



Years 1930 and 1931 compiled from Anuario de Estadistica Agropecuario. 1932 
and 1933 from Alamanaque de Ministerio de Agricultura de la Nacion, 1934 and 
1935 from Boletin ivlensual de Estadistica Agrope.cus.rio. 



ARGENTINA: Number of principal classes of cattle sold at Liniers Market 
near Buenos Aires by different classifications, 1934 and 1935, and 
6 months of 1936 with comparisons 







Share 




Share 


January 


-June 


Classification 


1934 


of 
total 


: 1935 


of 
■ total 


1935 


1936 




Number 


percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


- Number 


Steers : 














Chilled, exceptional 


45,213 


2 


.107,337 


5 


32,702 


55,372 




43,311 
111,103 


2 


30,943 
. 199,306 


2 


23 , 760 


5,481 
: 85 , 754 




6 


10 


89,080 


Domestic consumption 


192,201 


11 


193,922 


10 


93,229 


72,570 




324,553 
340 , 754 


18 


323,148 
323,078. 
512,461 


: 1? 


132,490 
155 ,356 


154,232 


Heifers 


19 


. '16 


197,162 


Calves 


434,816 


27 


26 


295,731 


312,491 




1,541,951 


•85 


1 , 695 , 195 


86 


822,398 


583,062 






Cows ; 
















26,732 
85 , 251 
57,641 


2 


37,034 


2 


13,635 


17,153 


Eat 


5 


102,749' 
58,825 


5 


44 , 785 
30,305 


77,805 


Cutters and canner, . . 


3 


3 


55,684 




169 . 624 


10 


193,608 


to 


35,926 


150 , 642 




65,906 


5 


68,310 


4 


27,261 


37,945 


Grand total 


1,777,481 


100 


1,962, 513 


100 


935,585 • 


1 ,071 , 552 



Compiled from Boletin Mensual de Estadistica Agropecuario. 



738 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



Vol. 33, No. 23 



ARGENTINA: Average prices per 100 pounds of cattle at Liniers market, Buenos 
Aires, first 6 months of 1935 and 1936 a/ 



Classification 




1935 


1936 


Jan. 


Feb . 


Mar . 


Apr . 


May 


June 


oLan_?_, 


Feb. 


Ma r . 


Apr . 


ilay_ 


J-,rne 




Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Steers: 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars. 


lars. 


lars 


-lar.il 
4.18 


lars. 


Chilled, exc eptional 


2.71 


2.78 


2.90 


3.00 


3.00 


3.41 


4.14 


3.99 


4.10 


4.10 


4.17 


Heavy weight 


2.34 


2.43 


2.48 


2.57 


2.63 


2.91 


3.69 


3 .52 


3.52 


3.42 


3 . 74 


3.70 


Light weight 


2.28 


2.37 


2.47 


2.59 


2.51 


2.83 


3.62 


3.45 


3.55 


3.44 


3.60 


3.61 


Butcher 


2.32 


2.28 


2.35 


2.41 


2.26 


2.50 


3.42 


3.27 


3.35 


3.21 


o . 3d 


3.37 


Yearlings 


2.56 


2.53 


2.50 


2.47 


2.35 


2.62 


3.36 


3.30 


3.23 


3.11 


3.38 


3.33 


Cows: 


























Special 


2.23 


2.19 


2.28 


2.40 


2,22 


2.39 


3.12 


3.05 


3.08 


2.99 


3.12 


3.14 


Fat 


1.77 


1.78 


1.86 


1.94 


1.82 


1.98 


2.69 


2.55 


2.60 


2.56 


2.59 


2.67 


Cutters and earners 


1.24 


1.24 


1.20 


1.26 


1.06 


1.16 


1.79 


1.81 


1.64 


1.51 


1.55 


1.67 


Heifers 


2,60 


2.55 


2.51 


2.48 


2. 33 


2.55 


3.29 


3.17 


3.05 


2.93 


3.23 


3.20 


Calves 


3.24 


3.12 


2.91 


2.88 


2.67 


2.94 


3.57 


3.51 


3.25 


3.15 


3 . 36 


3.43 


Suckling calves .... 


3.55 


3.27 


3.25 


3.19 


3.13 


3.49 


3.71 


3 • 29 


3.01 


3.11 


3.30 


3 .55 


Bulls and oxen 


1.08 


1.05 


1.07 


1.17 


1.02 


1.04 


1.6.2 


1.66 


1.70 


1.72 


1.74 


1.71 


Average - all cattle 


2.50 


2.46 


2.47 


2.46 


2.33 


2.67' 


3.30 


3.07 


3.13 


3.02 


3.21 


3.21 



Compiled from Boletin Mensual de Sstadistica Agropecuari 
Cotizaciones etc. aj Compiled from weekly quotations. 



o and Movimiento y 

See note "a", table below. 



ARGENTINA: Average price per 100 pounds and live 
at Liniers market, Buenos Aires, calendar ye 



weight of 
rs 1932 



cattle sold 
to 1935 



Classification 



Average price 



Average live weight 



1932 



1933 



934 
a/ 



1935 
a/ 



1932 : 1933 



1934 



1935 



Steers: 

Chilled, exceptional 

Heavy weight 

Light weight 

Butcher 
Yearlings 
Cows: 

Special 

Fat 

Gutters and 
Heifers 
Calves . 
Suckling calves 
Bulls ana. oxen 
Average - all cattle 



carrier 



Dol- 
lars 
2.12 
1.65 
1.77 
1.88 
2.13 



2.02 
1.67 
1.14 
2.10 
2.55 
3.21 
0.98 
2.04 



Dol- 
lars 
2. 53 

o p.n 

2.24 
2.15 
2.34 

2.12 
1.71 
1.10 
2.31 
2.73 
2.65 
1.10 
2.27 



Dol- 
lars 
2.76 
2.41 
2.44 
2 . 38 
2.62 

2 .33 
1.87 
1.34 
2.60 
3.03 
3.93 
1.20 
2.50 



Dpi- 
lars 
3.73 
2.78 
3.08 
2.77 
2.96 

2.71 
2.21 
.1.36 
2.86 
3.20 
4.00 
1.26 
2.89 



Pounds' Pounds Pounds Pounds 



1,127 


1,124 


1,131 


1,107 


1,332 


1,318 


1,287 


± 9 £o o 


1,115 


1,096 . 


1,098 


1,059 


981 


950 


928 


913 


701 


692 


636 


697 


946 


957 


957 


992 


996 


1,071 


1,054 


1 , 033 


1,003 


917 


904 


864 


659 


661 


657 


653 


430 


425 


434 


428 


236 


240 


240 


238 


1,387- 


1,393 


1,382 


1,345 


712 


712 ' 


714 


734 



Compiled from Mercados de Ganada y Carnes and from Boletin Mensual de Estadistiea 
Agropecuario , December. 

a/ Beginning May 1934 the terms "chilled exceptional quality", "heavy weight", 
and "light weight" are used for the first 3 grades of steers, the new types being 
similar to those formerly described as chilled, frozen, and continental. 



December 7, 193 6 Foreign Crops and Markets 739 

THE "GELD SITUATION I! r CATTLE AND BEEF . CONT'D 



ARGENTINA: Average prices per 100 pounds of different- grades of "beef steers 
purchased "by freezing companies at ranches, first 6 months, 1935 and 1936 



Classification 


1935 


1936 


J an . 


Feb . 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 




Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 


Dol- 




lars 


lars. 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


lars 


Steers: 


























Chilled 


3.62 


3.63 


3.53 


3.64 


3.65 


3.71 


4.14 


4.16 


4.13 


4.12 


4.14 


4.20 


Frozen 


2.07 


2.05 


1.99 


2.03 


2.06 


1.98 


3.72 


3.61 


3.54 


3.43 


3.52 


3.37 


Conserva (canners 


























and cutters) 


2.07 


1.85 


1.88 


2.31 


2.36 


2.45 


2.06 


2,54 


2.40 


2.19 


1.97 


2.12 


For domestic 


























consumption. . . . 


2.20 


2.28 


2.26 


1.82 


1.91 


1.80 


3.41 


3.30 


3.03 


3.07 


3.14 


3.21 


Mixed grades 


2.42 


2.23 


2.42 


2.71 


2.64 


2.76 


3.31 


3.00 


3.02 


2.84 


2.75 


2.72 


Ave rage , a 11 steers 


3.24 


3.12 


3.08 


3.14 


3.19 


3.29 


4.00 


3.89 


3.85 


3.81 


3.84 


4.00 



Compiled from Movimiento y Cotizaciones del Can ado y los carries en los princi- 
pals mercados del Pais y del Extranjero - Junta Naclonal de Came s (National 
Meat Board) . 



ARGENTINA: Monthly average price of beef steers per 100 pounds 
live-weight basis purchased by the packers at ranches, 1927-1935 



Month 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 a.) 


' 1935 a 




Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Jan .... 


4.20 


5.50 


5.68 


5.63 


3.97 


2.48 


1.97 


3*29 


3.24 


Feb 


4.36 


5.59 


5.73 


5.28 


4.07 


2.48 


2.03 


3.25 


3.12 


Mar. . . . 


4.57 


5.82 


5.75 


5.32 


4.44 


2.38 


2.24 


• 3.36 


3.08 


Apr. . . . 


4.81 


6.01 


5.72 


5.26 


4.26 


2.35 


2.34 


3.25 


3.14 


May 


4.95 


6.20 


5.66 


5.38 


3.87 


2.39 




3.29 


3.19 


June . . . 


5.02 


6.50 


%J m u J 


5.31 


3.85 


2.48 


2.87 


3.30 


3.29 


July . . . 


5.28 


6.66 


5.89 


5.26 


3.89 


2.45 


3.31 


3.38 


3.64 


Aug 


6.06 


6.57 


6.09 


5.35 


3.65 


2.45 


3.40 


3.42 


3.85 


Sept. . . 


6.42 


6.56 


6.10 


5.27 


3.37 


2.43 


3.50 


3.42 


4.14 


Oct 


6.70 


6.45 


6.46 


5.01 


2.84 


2.27 


3.66 


3.43 


4.15 


Nov. . . . 


6.39 


6.11 


6.42 


4.88 


3.07 


2.13 


3.84 


3.38 


4.15 


Dec. . . . 


5.68 


5.62 


5.94 


4.42 


2.65 


2.06 


3.30 


3.32 


4.11 






















Annual 




















average 


5.13 


6.07 


5.89 


5.21 


3.65 


2.37 


2.90 


3.34 


' 3.36 



Compiled from Compras de Ganados Bovinos, etc., Ministerio de Agricultura, 
Direccion de Ganaderia Division de Contralor de Comercio de Carne. 
%i From August 1934, the prices have been compiled from weekly quotations 
published by the National Meat Board. 



740 foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 23 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 
ARGENTINA: Exports of beef, by countries, 1931 - 1935 a/ 



Commodity 
to which 



and country 
xeorted 



CHILLED: 

Germany 

United Kingdom, 

Other countries 

Total 

ESQ ZEN: 

Germany 



Belgium, 



Erancu, ..„..,.. 

United States. . 

Italy 

Netherlands . . . 

United Kingdom, 

Other countries 

Total 

JERKED: 
PRESERVED: cf 

United Kingdom. 

Germany 

United States... 

Belgium. 

Canada 

Erance 

Netherlands ... 

Other countries 

Total 

TOTaL DEEP, CHILLED 
FROZEN, JERKED AND 
PRESERVED 



Year .ended Decembe: 



; 1931 


1932 ' 


1933 


1934 


1935 






prelim. 


1,000 


1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1,000 . 


; pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


( . - _L 


"i K 


( X 




XD 


| 774,621 


816 , 165 


771,352 


■ 770,305 


76o , 983 


1,688 


920 


' 308 


467 


1 , 376 


. (to, Ockj 


bi r, leu 


( ( X , (XX 


< <\J , OoO 






1 , e25 


i , oa o 


; l,oyo 


lO , ^5e> 


;■ X_L , b 'x-i. 


O A/1 C 


o , ^6 r 


'. Q i 1 C 

; b,xlo 


D , <0O'± 


• OO , 04U 


xo , oUx 


t n /in 


xo , Oo4 


5 , 846 


J 432 


472. 


392 


366 


356 


j 5,957 


4,370 


8,609 


: 19 , 237 


15,119 


i 5,919 


4,727 


3,384 


I 3,325 


2, 363 


i 116,175 


49 , 379 


31 , 654 


18,367 


20 , 428 


1,277 


1,395 


Ji^laL. 




.. _7,264 


: 184,483 


80 , 821 


69 , 553 


09 . 630 


67.575 


: 56 


5 


4 


66 


k/ 


f 84,934 


65*774 


73,014 


86,539 ■ 


74,804 


j 1,612 


1 , 667 


2,813 


562 ' 


1,142 


I. 13,106. 


10,617 


23,898 


21,839 ' 


37,670 


I. 3,287 


3 , 902 


■ .3,190 


1,050 ; 


1 , 693 


4,553 


3,419 


4,145 


. 6,845 


7,637 


5 , 672. 


1,779 


1,550' 


• '. 445 ' 


370 


: 1,272 


1,671 


2,575 


! 615 • 


1,217 


i ■ 7,005 


8 , 559 


10,061 


16,709 ■ 


23 . 444 


:' . 121 , 425 


97,386 


l2l , 2'xb 


134 , 604 I 


147,977 


,ii;082,484 


9^5,318 


962,514 


975,125 ; 


983,926 


il Corner cio 


E:ctwrior , 


and Bole tin' Mensual 


de 



Estatistica Agropecuaria, December issue 1935. 
a/ Eresh beef not reported separately, 
b/ Not separately classified. 

c/ May include a small quantity of other kinds of meat. 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 741 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



URUGUAY: Slaughter in packing plants and for domestic consumption, 

1929 to 1935 



Year 


Freezing 

e st ab- 
lishments 


preserved 

meat 
f actories 


Salting 
- plants 


Dome stic 
consumption 


Total 




Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


1929 


852,764 


9,806 


33, 338 


479,141 


1,375,049 


1930 . . , 


786,405 




31,404 


467,435 


1 , 285 , 244 


1931 


616,568 


3,329 


7,421 


448,394 


1,075,712 


1932 


496,992 


2,044 


2,643 


435,541 


937,220 


1933, 


532,281 


2,008 


5,393 


471,953 


1,011,635 


1934 


599,492 


3,327 


12,757 


490,220 


1,105,796 


1935 


a/ 692,000 


b/ 12,000 


b / 61 , 000 


b/ 544,000 


c/l ,309,000 



Compiled from Anuario Estadistica, Pt. II, 1933 and 1934, and Sintesis 
Estadistica, May 1935. 

a/ Unofficial estimate based on statistics published in the Review of the 
River Plate. 

b/ Estimate based on 6 months' statistics. 

c/ Unofficial estimate based on incomplete statistics. 

URUGUAY: Monthly receipts of cattle and calves at North Stock Yards 
(TabladaNorte) Montevideo, 1932-1936 



Month 


1932 : 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 




Number ; 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Jan 


58,981 : 


62,103 


80,692 


91,773 


73,771 


Feb 


62,389 ; 


48,469 


64,969 


81,602 


80,791 


Mar 


83,444 : 


78,745 


76,129 


96,900 


98,064 


Apr ' 


83, 611 


64,22 5 


86,509 


98,883 


85,239 


May 


64,963 


80,681 


86,126 


101,062 


62 , 684 


June 


56,390 


86,894 


62,917 


84,676 


63,144 


July 


41,569 


70,742 


70,139 


83,850 


53,586 


Aug 


54,642 


70,165 


56,404 


67,853 


57,647 


Setit 


41,699 


39,920 


58,235 


68 , 706 




Oct 


37,309 


47,017 


82,277 


58 , 901 




Nov 


47,633 


59,056 


69,996 


71,346 




Dec 


57,569 


57,881 


91,305 


85,379 




Year a/ 


690,199 


765,898 


835,698 


990,936 





Compiled from Association Consignatarlos de Can ados. 

a/ The number of calves received were as follows: 1930, 258,330; 1931, 197,498; 
1932, 189,163; 1933, 155,972; 1934, 199,355; 1935, 



742 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Ho. 2 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 

URUGUAY: Exports of beef, "by countries, 1931-1934 and January- 
June, 1934 and 1935 



Commodity and 
country to which 
exported 



FROZEN ; 

France 

United Kingdom.. 

Italy 

Belgium 

Netherlands 

Germany 

United States . . . 

Other countries. 

Total 

CHILLE D: 

Total 

SALTED; 

Total 

CANNED OR PRESERVED 



United Kingdom., 
United States. . . 

Germany 

Belgium , 

Other countries, 
Total 

JERKED; 

Total 

TOTAL BE. 



5F, F ROZEN, 
CHILLED , SALTED , 
PRE SERVED , JERKED , 



Year ended December 31 



: 1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 a/ 


1934 a/ 


1935 a/ 


: 1,000 

; pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


: 36 226 

• 27,909 

• 12,930 
| 5,827 

1,684 

: 730 

: 163 
5,662 


33 233 

20,976 

20 , 795 

1,830 

153 

263 

52 
8 P 494 


32,072 
13,321 
8,045 
5,722 
547 
355 
123 
4,435 








. 93,151 


85,796 


64,620 


50,385 


41,996 


47,065 


' 87,306 


58,605 


64,782 


61,410 


53,971 


49,441 


837 


186 


909 


k/ 


y 




41 388 
■ 12,883 
1,960 
1,417 
6,032 


26 340 
14,500 
693 
833 
2,052 


31 360 
22,460 

1,569 
930' 

3.710 








63 . 700 


44 P 418 


60.029 


70.852 


53,914 


73,372 


3,307 


504 


1,302 


3.070 


1.880 


4.039 


! 248,394 


189,509 


191,642 


185,717 


151 , 761 


173,917 



Janu ; *r y-Q c t o b e r 



Compiled from Annuario Estadi'stico de la Republiea Oriental del Uruguay, Part 
3a; Sintesis Estadistica de la Republica Oriental del Uruguay, August 1935; 
and Bole tin de Hacienda, a/ Not available by countries, b/ Not yet available 

United King dom end Empi re ver sus foreign beef 

The British Ministry of Agriculture .and Fisheries is still endeavoring 
to work out a policy whereby British beef production may be increased modarat 
and remuneratively, without a burdensome advance in prices to consumers. So 
far, the scheme adopted in September 1934, entailing the payment of a subsidy 
to producers of high-grade cattle, has neither materially improved prices of 
domestic beef nor encouraged increased production of cattle in the United 
Kingdom. Judging by average monthly market Quotations on good-quality beef 
at leading English markets, prices have run slightly higher this year than 
last, averaging for the first 9 months 14.1 cents per pound as against 13.5 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



743 



THE WO ELD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 

cents in the comparable months of 1935. During 1934, however, the average 
for the same months was 15.1 cents. Although uneconomic increase in production 
was not the aim of the control program, it is to be noted that since its 
inauguration, cattle numbers in England and Wales have actually decreased by 
some 125,000 head, or to 6,534,000 head as of June 1936. 

At present, beef is imported free of duty, the shipments being re- 
stricted by the exporting countries. For several years, a modification of the 
cattle and beef import policy after the expiration of the Anglo-Argentine 
trade agreement on October 31, 1936, has been contemplated. On July 6, 1936, 
a permanent beef policy was accordingly announced, which included a small 
duty on imports from non- Empire sources, together with quantitative limita- 
tions of such imports, payment of an increased subsidy to domestic producers 
amounting to approximately £5,000,000 per yea.r paid on a quality ba,sis, free 
and increasing importations from Empire countries, and restriction of total 
imports from all sources to the level of recent years;. 

On August 7 , termination of the Anglo- Argentine agreement as of No- 
\ember 7, 1935, was formally announced by the British Government. For several 
months, negotiations for .an agreement to take its place have been conducted 
in London by representatives of the two countries, but as yet no satisfactory 
result has been obtained. The British proposal that a 3-f arthing-per-pound 
(1.5-cent) import duty be levied on all imports of chilled end frozen beef 
and veal from non-Empire ' source s and that imports from Argentina be subject 
to progressive quantitative reductions of not more than 5 percent per annum 
has not proved acceptable to Argentina. Meanwhile, there have been several 
extensions of the former limitations. 

Total imports of beef and veal into the United Kingdom during 1935 
were slightly reduced from those of the previous year. Imports of chilled 
beef from Argentina, which account for more than half total annual imports 
of beef and veal, amounted to 776,967,000 as against 777,517,000 in 1934 and 
over 360,800,000 pounds in the year July 1931- June 1932, the period used as 
a base in calculating quota allotments to foreign suppliers. Under the 
terms of the Ottawa Agreements, no reduction in imports into the United 
Kingdom of foreign chilled beef was required and the Anglo-Argentine .agree- 
ment of 1933 gave Argentina assurance of freedom from quantitative restrictions 
up to at least 90 percent of the amount shipped in the base year. That country 
has voluntarily and successively cut down exports to the United Kdngdom until 
in 1935 they amounted to 90 percent of tne 1931-32 figure. In the first 
three quarters of the current year they were equal to 93 percent of the im- 
ports in corresponding quarters of the base year. Imports from Uruguay and 
Brazil likewise have been reduced about 10 percent and 6 percent, respectively, 
from quantities imported in the base period. 

In the period July 1931-June 1932 Empire countries shipped no chilled 
beef to the United Kingdom, but in 1935 they furnished nearly 6 percent of 



744 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 23 



THE T70R1D SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 

the total and in the first 9 months of 133 6, almost 7 percent. Frozen "beef, 
the predominant share of which has long been supplied by Empire countries, 
since the conclusion of the Ottawa Agreements in 1932 has "become a virtual 
Empire monopoly. By the terras of the agreement "between New Zealand and 
Great Britain, the United Kingdom limited imports from foreign suppliers 
after June 1934 to 65 percent of the amount of such imports during 1931-32. 
In actuality they have "been reduced to less than 22 percent of the 1931-32 
quantities, in the first 9 months of 1936 amounting to 16,905,000 pounds as 
against a total from all sources of 192,493,000 pounds. On the other hand, 
in comparison with those of the "base year, Empire supplies increased 60 
percent in 1935 end 61 percent during January -September 1936. 

Imports of tinned beef into the United Kingdom have increased steadily 
from the low point of 84,000,000 pounds in 1932 to over 109,000,000 pounds 
in .1935, and, in the first 9 months of 1936, at over 86,000,000 pounds, they 
were approximately 5,000,000 pounds above those for the same period in 1935. 
Argentina continues to furnish the bulk of this item, although imports from 
that country have declined during the past 2 years. Uruguay practically 
doubled shipments of canned beef to the United Kingdom in 1935 in comparison 
with 1934 figures. In the first three quarters of the current year, however, 
there has been some decrease in the rate of these imports. As in other types, 
of beef, Empire supplies of tinned beef, largely from New Zealand, have in- 
creased rapidly from less than 20,000,000 pounds in 1933 to over 50,000,000 
pounds in 1935 and nearly 49,000,000 pounds for the first 9 months of 1936. 

In 1935 all forms of beef imports into the United Kingdom declined 
some 19,000,000 pounds from those of the preceding year, but this decrease 
was more than offset by larger imports of cattle. In 1934, 509,500 head were 
imported, and 592,600 in 1935, an increase of 16 percent. This increase was 
continued during the first 9 months of 1936, when 492,000 head were imported 
as against 391,000 in the corresponding months of 1935. Increased exports 
from the Irish Free State, the chief source of such supplies, have undoubtedly 
been encouraged by the 10-percent reduction in duty granted by Great Britain, 
effective February 18,1936. During the January- Sept ember period in 1936, im- 
ports from the Irish Free State into the United Kingdom increased to 463,000 
head from 384,000 in 1935. 

Au stralia 

Cattle raising is one of the major industries in Australia and has 
been encouraged for a number of years by the Government. Australian herds 
are said to be practically free from disease, and cattlemen are reorganizing 
the industry with the objective of eventually producing as high-quality 
chilled and frozen beef as that of Argentina and Uruguay for export to the 
United Kingdom. In line with the British policy of increased preferential 
treatment to Empire countries, and with the announced permanent beef policy 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



745 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEE, CONT'D 

for protection of the industry in the United Kingdom, a tentative arrangement 
between Great Britain and Australia has recently been made providing for pro- 
gressive increases in imports of Australian beef into the United Kingdom, to 
accompany the 5-percent reduction in the Argentine quota and a 3-farthing- 
per-pound (1.5-cent) duty on foreign beef. Restrictions against chilled beef 
in favor of frozen beef exports from Australia are also removed. The effective 
ness of these provisions, of course, depends upon the securing by Great 
Britain of en agreement with Argentina making possible such concessions to 
Australia. 

Cattle numbers in Australia increased considerably in 1934, totaling 
14,049,000 head as of January 1, 1935, in comparison with 13,512,000 head a 
year earlier. With a, more or less assured position in the British market 
for Australian beef, numbers will probably continue more or less steadily 
the upward trend of the past 5 years, 

Australian exports of beef, largely frozen, have increased rapidly 
during the last few years. Chilled beef, however, is becoming increasingly 
important in the trade, amounting to over 21,000,000 pounds in 1934-35. In 
1935-56 the United Kingdom took 171,000,000 pounds, or 87 percent, of total 
exports as a.gainst less than 101,000,000 pounds in 1930-31, when exports 
to that country represented only 65 percent of the total. 

New Zeal and 

Cattle numbers in New Zealand have tended to decrea.se slightly from 
the high point of 4,501,000 head reached in 1934. Slaughter has also de- 
clined, and the reduced domestic slaughter stock in 1955 and 1936 has been 
accompanied by higher prices for frozen beef. The average monthly price 
for the period January- August in 1936 was 4.78 cents per pound compared with 
4.08 cents in 1935, 

Official trade statistics for New Zealand place total exports of beef 
and veal during 1935 at 103,667,000 pounds, or 3,000,000 pounds above 1934 
exports. Chilled, beef is not separately classified, but an increasing share 
of total exports is represented by this item. Import statistics for the 
United Kingdom show that over 20,000,000 pounds of chilled beef were imported 
from New Zealand during the first 9 months of 1936, whereas only 9,862,000 
pounds were imported from that source in the same months of 1935. Imports 
of frozen beef, on the other hand, declined materially in 1936, though 
frozen veal and boned beef showed small increases. Total imports of frozen 
and chilled bet>f from New Zeedand wera 3.5 percent below those of January- 
September 1935. The United States has proved the most important outlet, 
after the United Kingdom, for New Zealand beef, over 2,000,000 pounds having 
been marketed there in 1935 and nearly 1,000,000 pounds during the first 
9 months of 1936, In 1934 only a little over 20,000 pounds were shipped to 
the United States. 



746 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 23 

THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



UNITED KINGDOM: Imports of "beef and veal, by countries, 1931-1935 



Commodity and country 
from which, imported 


Year ended December 31 


1931 j 


1932 ; 


1933 


1934 


m. 


hi M TP O "LT tttt rt— p-r--i m TXTT1 A "Pi m 0 

i! JtEiori , jM.CJ£PT HEARTS, 


1 nr>n 

1 , UUU ; 

pounds 


i n n r\ 
1 , UUU 

pounds 


1 , uuu 
pounds 


i Ann 
1 , UUU 

pounds 


± , UUU 
pounds 


TONGUES, ETC.: 


i 743 
aZ_ 


552 
0 ' 


4,302 
4 






CHILLED: 


743 


552 


4,306 


b/ 523 


b/ 257 


886,052 
87,185 
57.050 


' 874, 089 ' 
56,432 
54, 938 


778,605 
62,764 
73.819 


777,517 
62, 832 
83,725 


1 1 1 r 

776,967 
52, 895 
110.908 


FROZEN, EXCEPT HEARTS, 
TONGUES, ETC.: 


1,040,287 


985,459 


915,188 


924,074 


950,770 


117,989 
52,584 
25,776 
24, 349 


100,111 
70,039 
21,010 

17 , 936 
7.33,2 


125,326 
89,566 
24,339 
10,390 
14,739 


169,820 
112,418 
14,657 

5,745 
15.717 


150,347 
87,777 
13,501 
5,576 
22,318 


TCTAL FRESH, CHILLED, 

AND FROZEN 


236 , 946 


216,428 


264,360 


318,357 


279,519 


1,277,976 


1,202,439 


1,183,854 


1,242,954 


1,230,546 


QUEER: 

Hearts, tongues, 

livers, kidneys, etc 

Extracts, essences, «tc..«.» 


474 
81,014 
654 
120, 339 
7,390 


: 55 
i 85,998 
: 476 
! 84, 289 
i 5,861 


57 

80,842 
411 
95,883 
7,582 


sJ 

73,487 

d 
106, C6 7 

7,461 


[ " a/ 1 

74,335 

1 a/ 

' 109,653 
; 6,917 



Compiled from Trade end Navigation of the United Kingdom, 1934; Monthly Accounts 
Relating to Trade of the United Kingdom, December issue, 1935. 
a/ Less than 500 pounds . 

>/ N«t reported by countries. Includes hearts, tongues, livers, etc., fresh, 

and heef, salted. 

c/ Included -with "beef, fresh." 



December 7, 1936 



Foreign Crops end Markets 



747 



THE WORLD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



UNITED KINGDOM 
select beef 



: Monthly average wholesale price of English National Mark, 
per 100 pounds at. selected English markets, 1931 to 1936 



Month 


[ 1931 a/ 


" 1932 a/ 


' 1933 b/ 


* 19 34 b/ 


\ 1935 b/ 


[ 1936 b/ 




: Dollars 


: Dollars 


: Dollars 


: Dollars 


: Dollars 


: Dollars 


January 


: 16.5 


: 11.1 


: 10.9 


: 15.6 


: 13.8 


: 13.8 


February 


:. . 16.5 : 


f 11.2 


: 10.7 


: 15.2 


5 13.0 


: 13.6 


March 


; 16.7 


: 12.1 


: 10.7 , 


: 14.9 


: 12.7 : 


: 13.3 


April 


: 16.7 ; 


: 12.7 : 


:. .11.4 


: 15.0 ! 


I 13.1 • 


: 13.5 


May • 


: 16.7 


: 12.6 : 


» I o R 


: 15.0 : 


: 13.6 * 


13.9 


June 


18. 0 • 


: 13.3 : 


: 12.3 . 


: 14.9 • 


: 14.0 : 


: 15.3 


July ! 


: 18.5 j 


;. 12.2 • 


13.6 


: 15.0 ; 


: 14.2 : 


15.1 


August : 


17.0 < 


: 11.3 : 


• • 12^9 : 


! 15.4 : 


13.8 : 


: 14.7 


September : 


14.6 : 


: 10.8 : 


1.2.6 - 


: 14. S : 


: 13.5 : 


14.1 


October : 


12.4 j 


9.7 j 


12.6 : 


: 13.9 : 


13.1 : 




November . . . . « i 


11.0 : 


9.2 : 


14.2 : 


13.7 ; 


; 12.8 : 




December : 


10.5 : 


9.9 ■ 


14.9 ; 


: 13.8 : 


13.3 : 




Average ' 


15.4 ; 


'. i:L - 4 ! 


12.4 


; 14.8 : 


" 13.4 ; 





Coraoiled as follows 



published in Agricultural 



1931-1933, Monthly averages a; 
Statistics, Part II, London, annual. 1934, 1935, and 1936, The Agricultural Mar- 
ket Report , London, weekly. Monthly quotations are averages of weekly averages. 
Quotations are converted at current monthly average rates of exchange, 
a/ Average at Leeds and London, b/ Average at Birmingham, Leeds, and London. 



AUSTRALIA 



Exports of beef and veal, by countries, 1931-32 to 1935-36 



Country to 
which exported 


: Year ended June 36 


! 1931-32 


j 1932.-33 


I 1933 -34 


I 1934-3-5 


: 1935-36 
: prel. 




: 1,000 ! 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1,000 


: 1,000 


CHILLED AND FROZEN : 


; pounds j 


pounds 


: pounds 


: pounds 


pounds 


Un ited Kingdom 


: 128,146 : 


124,126 


: 150,874 . 


: 193,693 


; 171,354 




16,581 < 


! 8,398 


! 3,612 : 


l 874 ; 


; 433 




80 ; 


: 0 : 


! 76 i 


! a/ ] 


i a/ 


Philippine Islands.: 3,180 : 


5,322 : 


; 2,333 : 1,365 : 1,221 




1,033 ! 


: o j a/ : 


a/ t a/ 




t 5,911 ; 


: 2,073 ; 


2,168 : 


2,962 : 


: 3,649 




I 4,308 j 


! 6,156 


; 5,676 : 


4,721 : 


9,782 




15 : 


12 : 


2 : 


77 ! 


: a/ 


Other countries 


: 8,45S : 


7,886 : 


7,735 : 


3,407 : 


10,384 




165,372 


153,973 


173,076 I 


212,099 ; 


V 196,823 



Compiled from Trade Customs and Excise Revenue and Quarterly Summary of 



Australian Statistics, 1936, June - : 
countries." 



a/ If any, included in "Other 



748 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 23 

THE WORLD SITUATION. IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 



NEW ZEALAND: Monthly average export price per 100 po-ands of frozen "beef, 
by months, 1931-1936 



Month 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


19ob 




Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


January . : . . ;• 


5.77 


2.39 


3.04 


3.85 


3.73 


' ' 5.12 


February "... 


5.00 


2.78 


2.88 


3.47 


4.21 


4.85 


March . . . : 


•■ 5.08 


2.84 


a/ 2.58 


3.83 


4.19 ' 


' 4.90 


April . . . : 


4.95 


2.78 


2.57 


3.98 


4.14 


' '4.84 


May ' 


4.81 


2.57 


2.72 


3.88 


3.94 


4.72 


June 


4.41 


2.38 


2.71 


3.84 ' 


4 .15 


4.64 


July 


4.49 


2.32 


3.23 


3.93 


' 4.02 


4.56 


August . .' 


4.34' 


2.24 


3.30 


3.38 


4.22 


4.62 


September 


3.83 


2.31 


3.20 


3.81 


4.10 




October .' 


3.33 


2 . 25 


3.50 


3.74 


4.39 




November 


3.12 


3.10 


•3.29 


3.67 


4.82 




December 


2.95 


2.04 


3.83 


3.46 


5.43 




Annual average .... 


4.34 


2.50 


3.07 


3.74 


4.28 





Compiled from mimeographed report received from New Zealand correspondent, 
a/ March 1933 to date, prices are quoted as of the fifteenth of each month. 



NSW ZEALAND : Exports of beef and veal, by countries, 1931-1935 



Commodity and 




Year 


ended December 31 




country to 
which exported 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 
prel. a/ 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


BEEF, FROZEN: 












United Kingdom . . . 


. 38 , 735 


49,298 


87,962 


92,298 




United States .... 


665 


74 


121 


19 




Other countries . . 


97 


333 


918 


342 




Total 


39,497 


'. 49,705 


39,001 


. 92,659 


91 , 570 


VEAL, FROZEN: 












Unit ed Kingdom . . . 


11,142 


'. 10,115 


! 14,911 


7,840 




United States .... 


301 


104 


64 


. " 1 




Italy . . 


1,811 


0 


0 


0 




Other countries .. 


33 


21 


3 


87 




Total 


13,287 


10,240 


14 , 978 


7,928 


12,097 


TOTAL BEEF AND VEAL 


52,784 


59 , 945 


103,979 


• 100,587 


103,667 



Compiled from Statistical Report on Trade and Shipping of New Zealand and 
Monthly Abstract of Statistics, January issue, 1936. 
a/ Not available by countries. 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 749 

THE WO ELD SITUATION IN CATTLE AID BEEF, CONT'D 



UNION OP SOUTH AFBICA: Exports of beef and veal, cy countries, 
1913 and 1925-1935 a/ 



Year ended 
December 31 






Expo 


rted to 








Italy 


France 


United 
Kingdom 


.Belgium 


Morocco 


Other 
countrie s 


Total 






i one, 


1 000 


1 000 


1 000 


1 000 


1 000 


~\ 000 






[J U UJ.*U- o 


"Pi m 1 T*l c\ Q 




nnn q 


Tin - ; l n rl ^ 


T) on n rl ^ 


ti oi i n d ^ 


FFESH AND ESQ ZEN: 
















1913 


• • 


y 


1/ 


0 


k/ 


£/ 


121 


c/ 121 


IS 25 




14,250 


6,437 


806 ' 


335 


0 


1 


21,830 


1926 


• • 


16,159 


14,136 


2,917 


655 


0 


150 


34,017 


1927 


* * 


11,460 


256 


647 


79 


0 


1,096 


13,536 


1928 


• • 


15 , 748 


246 


625 


5 


261 


i/ 


16,885 


1929 


• • 


21,506 


V 


3 , 052 


223 


0 


265 


25,046 


1930 


• • 


13 , 769 


8,240 


3,782 


1,101 


1 , 709 


1,143 


29,749 


1931 


• • 


14,858 


4, 646 


946 


45 


0 


1,096 


21,591 


1932 




14,590 


0 


830 


0 


0 


356 


15,876 


1933 


• • 


19 , 494 


0 


3,527 


0 


0 


5 


23,026 


1934 


• • 


2,644 


0 


3,041 


0 


0 


160 


5,845 


1935 


. t 


e/e, 985 


0 


7,025 


0 


0 


469 


14,479 



Compiled from Annual Statement of Trade and Shipping of Union of South Africa, 
a/ Excludes ships' stores, b/ If any, included in "Other countries." 
cj Includes ships' stores amounting to 112,000 pounds, d/ Less than 500 pounds, 
e/ Includes 6,757,000 pounds to Italian possessions. 



C ontinen ta l Eu ropean i mporting countr ies 

Tap resumption this year of imports of South American beef into Germany 
more than offsets the further decline in imports into Belgium, France, and 
the Netherlands. In the first 9 months of 1935, Germany imported over 
59,700,000 pounds of chilled and frozen beef, largely from Argentina. Last 
year, no such beef was imported. The short supplies of domestic beef developed 
this year, however, prompted a more liberal attitude with respect to imports. 

Imports of South American beef into Belgium in the first 8 months 
of 1936 declined 29 percent below the 1935 figures to reach 11,192,000 pounds. 
Imports into France also were reduced in 1936, the figure of 4,107,000 pounds 

1 for the first 6 months being 45 percent smaller than the comparable 1935 im- 
ports. In the Netherlands, imports of overseas beef, at 1,600,000 pounds for 

; the first 10 months of 1936, were 22 percent smaller than those of a year 
earlier. 



750 



jj'oreign Crops and Markets Vol.. 53, No. 23 

THE WOULD SITUATION IN CATTLE AND BEEF, CONT'D 
FRANCE; Imports of beef, "by countries, 1931-1935 a/ 



Commodity and country 
from which imported 



Year ended December 51 



: 1951 


■ 1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 
£rel. 


: l , 000 

: pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1 , 000 
pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1 , 000 
pounds 


■ 20 , 032 


3, 742 


1 , 516 


594 


299 


i 80 


13 ■ 


4 


1 


1 


j 28,816 
i 31,889 
! 5,772 
', 10,098 


20 , 745 
11,325 
3,093 
11,781 


16,159 
6,880 
1,146 

12,968 


6,276 
4,968 
1,546 
13,511 


4,175 
1, 818 
3,790 
14,076 


• 9,940 
■ 8,034 
; 3 , 348 


876 
2,096 
1,067 . 


167 
17 
1,574 


' 10 
1,691 


• k/ 
' */ 

1,339 


; 97,897 


50,983 


38.931 


28 . 022 


25 .198 


' 118,009 


54,73d 


40,451 


26,717 


25,496 



FRESH AND CH ILLED : 

Total 

SALTE D: 

Total 

FROZ EN; 

Uruguay 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Madagascar. 

Belgium and 

Luxemburg 

United Kingdom. . . . 

Other countries. . . 
Total frozen . . . 
TO TAT i B . 



ral du Commerce Exterieur and Statistiq.ue Mensuollv 

/ 



du Commerce Exterieur de la France,, December, 1935. a/ Includes all meats 



Compiled from Tableau Gen 
du Commerce Exterieur de 
except mutton and pork, b/ If any, included in "Other countries." 

GERMANY: Imports of beef, by countries, 1931-1935 



Year endea December 31 



Commodity and country 
from which imported 


i 1931 


1932 j 


1933 


1934 


1935 
prel. 




; 1 , 000 


l , ooo : 


1,000 


1 , 000 


1,000 




■ pounds 


pounds : 


pounds 


pounds 


pounds 


FRESH; 
















2,758 : 


2,910 


4,505 


3,350 






783 i 


347 


- ' 330 


161 






2,391 


3,230 


1,196 


39 


Belgium and 














. : 41 


63 


43 ' 


43 


47 




. i 628 


346 


207 


115 


£/ 1,450 






6,541 


5,737 


6,191 


5,567 



CHILLED A ND FROZEN; 
Total. 



398 



52 



.TOTAL BEEF ■ 18^361 



6_j_393 



6,737 



6jl91 



0 



Compiled from Monatliche Nachweise uberyauswartigen H&ndel Deutschlands , 
December issues. 

a/ Includes 1,267,645 pounds imported from France. 



, o o ( 



December 7, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

THE WQBLD SITUATION IH CATTLE AND BEE? , CONT'D 

Imports of "beef and veal, by countries, 
1931-1935 



751 



Commodity and country 
from which imported 
_ : : , . u 


1931 


1932 


1933' : 1934 


19.35 


BEEE AND VEAL, FRESR: 


1 , 000 
pounds 


: 1,000 
■pounds 


1,000 : 1,000 
pounds ! pounds 


1,000 
pounds 


1,090 
28,348 

CAP 


266 
•13,245 • 

x o 


58 : 33 
11,352 I 7,146 
P 1 4 


32 
5,329 
in 




~"3b~r080 


: 13, 526 


. 11,412 ; . 7,183 


.5,472 


BEEP AND VEAL, CHILLED OR 
EEC' ZEN: 


14,569 
1 , 189 


• • 7 , 232 


5,297 : 3,190 


2,580 
95 


Other countries 


340 . 


78 ; 93 


15,753 


. -7,572 


5,375 . . 3,283 


2,676 


BEEE, SALTED: 


94 


• 45 


163 . 1 11 


6 


TOTAL BEEF 


45,932 


■ 21 , 143 


16,950 | 10,477 


8,153 



M aandst at i stick van den In-, Uit-en Doorvoer ,. December , 1935. 
a/ If any, included in "Other countries." 

NETHERLANDS: Exports of beef and veal by countries, 

1931-1935 



Commodity and country 



Year ended December 31 



from which exported 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


19,3 5 ( 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


BEEF AND VEAL, FRESH: 


pounds 


pounds 


. pounds 


pounds 


pound s 




1,773 


611 


72 


39 


154 




10,486 


. 4,602 


. 1,336 


573 


193 




4,041 


822 


257 


8 


a/ 




38 


24 


100 


331 


210 


Total 


16,338 


6,059 


1,765 


951 


557 


BEEF & VEAL, ALL OTHER b/ 


71 


55 


33 


369 


21 




16,409 


6,114 


1,798 


1,320 


578 



Compiled from Jaarstatistiek van den In-, Uit-en Doorvoer. 
a/ If any, included in "Other countries." 

b/ This data includes beef and veal, chilled or frozen, salted and dried. 



752 — 



Foreign Crops and Market^ 
IFDEX 



Vol, 35, Fo. 23 



.... Page 

Late cables 704 

Crop and Market Prospects. 705 



CATTLE AMD BEEF: 
Beef; 

Consumption, per capita, prin- 
cipal countries, 1933-1935.. 721 

Exports: 

Argentina, 1931-1936! 740 

Australia, 1931-1935 . . 747 

Brazil, 1931-1935........... 735 

Canada, 1929-1935 731 

Fatherlands, 1931-1935! ..... 751 
Hew Zealand, . 1931-1935, ..... 748 
Union of so. Africa, 1913- 

1935 749 

U.S., 1931-1935 727 

Uruguay, 1931-1935 742 

: J rports: / 

France, 1931-1935 

Germany, 1931-1935 

F ether lands-, 1931-1935. 

U.K., 1931-1935 

U.S., 1934-1936 

Import control, U. K. , 1936 
Prices; .•■ 

Few Zealand, 1931-1936... 

U. K. , 1931-1936 ..... 

Production: 

Canada, 1929-1935........ 

Principal countries, 1931- 
1935 



Cattle: 



Exports/ Canada, 1929^-19357 
Imports, U. S., Jan. -Sept., 

1935, 1936 

Import quotas, U.S., 1936.. 



730 
75C 
751 
746' 
726 
742 

748 
747 

731 

719 

729 

724 
723 



Pa^e 

CATTLE AND BEEF, COFT'D, 
Cattle, Cont'd; 
Numb er s : 

Canada, 1930-1936 , . . 730 

. World, 1931-1935 713 

Prices: 

Argentina, 1935, 1936 738 

Canada, 1932~1936 739 

U. S., 1931-1936, . 728 

Sales, Argentina, 1927-1935.... 737 
SITUATION, W0PLD, FOVEIvIBER 1936. 709 
Slaughter: ' 

Argentina, 1926-1935 736- 

Canada, 1929-1935 •. ... 731 

Principal countries, 1931- 

1935 717 

Uruguay, 1929-1935 741 

Stockyards receipts, Uruguay, 

1932-1936 ....... 741 

Fruit, production, Canada, 1935, 

1936 707 

potatoes, situation, New Brunswick, 

November 1936: 707 

Sugar : 

Exports, U.K., 1924-1936 706 

Imports, U.K., 1924-1936 706 

Production, U.K., 1924-1936 706 

Subsidy, U.K., 1924-1936 706 

Sugar beets: 

Acreage, U.K., 1924-1936 706 

production, U.K., 1924-1936 70S 

Trade agreement, Germany- Yugoslavia, 
Oct. 20, 1936 708 

Wheat: 

Crop and market conditions, 

■Cnlna, IIOv. 27, 1936 705 

prices, Shanghai, Nov. 27, 1936.. 705 
f(?ol, saleS,, Jj.lt. and Australia, 
f}@c ember *2 and 3, 1936 704